Carpinus betulus

common hornbeam - hedging range

25 plants - 40-60cm
pot size guide
£39.99 Email me when in stock
50 plants - 40-60cm
pot size guide
£69.99 Email me when in stock
100 plants - 40-60cm
pot size guide
£119.99 Email me when in stock
1 year guarantee
All you can buy delivered for £4.99

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: March
  • Flower colour: vivid-green
  • Other features: distinctive, grey, fluted bark
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    To find out more about how to plant a hedge, click here

    A splendid tree with green leaves that turn a rich copper in autumn. As a treeThe Royal Horticultural Society bare root hedging range is a very low cost way of planting a hedge. The bare root plants are only available to buy and plant when dormant. (November-March) These plants, with known seed provenence, are grown in 220 acres of rich Herefordshire soil. As they are dispatched directly from the fields, rather than through a nursery, they are much fresher than imported or even stored plants. RHS bare root plants are grown through low input horticultural methods. Plants are rotated with pigs annually, to improve soil condition. Water is harvested in the winter for use in the summer. No heat or polytunnels are used and, as the plants are dispatched direct from the fields, transport is kept to a minimum.

    Vivid green catkins in March, followed by clusters of green fruit, and toothed mid-green leaves turning orange and gold in autumn. Hornbeam is an excellent native tree for a large garden. Pyramidal in shape, it tolerates wet, clay soils and responds well to pruning, making it perfect for training as a formal hedge.

  • Garden care: To train as a central-leader standard remove all of the lateral branches on the lowest third of the main stem and shorten the laterals by half on the middle third, making angled cuts to an outward-facing bud. On the upper third remove only dead, diseased or damaged growth and crossing stems. It is essential though that any pruning is undertaken in late autumn or winter when they are fully dormant as the sap has a tendancy to 'bleed' if pruned at any other time of the year.

Please note that as we grow the hedging especially for you, we need to take full payment when you place your order so as to reserve stock for you. The bareroot plants will then be despatched to you during November.

Buxus sempervirens

common box - Hedging range

A fabulous formal hedge

£17.97 Buy

Ilex aquifolium

English holly

Bright red berries in winter

£11.99 Buy

Amelanchier lamarckii

June berry

Superb autumn colour

£49.99 Buy

Malus 'Evereste'

crab apple

Splendid free flowering conical tree

£49.99 Buy
 

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