Aquilegia chrysantha 'Yellow Queen'

granny's bonnet

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This later-flowering lemon, will-o'-the-wisp aquilegia, has swept-back spurs and fragrance - find it a warm sheltered position where it gets afternoon sun so that the fragrance travels

Val Bourne - Garden Writer

1 year guarantee

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: May-June
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Bright lemon yellow, upward-facing flowers with long spurs that flare out behind appear in early summer on tall stems above clumps of ferny bluish-green foliage. The flowers are good for cutting, are fragrant, and attract butterflies. This is a short-lived but easy-to-grow perennial that will self-seed freely.

  • Garden care: Sow seeds in containers in a cold frame as soon as ripe or in spring, but they may be different to the parent plant. Best to leave to naturalise as they dislike root disturbance, but large clumps can be lifted and divided in early spring. Contact with the sap may cause irritation.


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CrocusAquilegia chrysantha'Yellow Queen'
 
5.0

(based on 1 review)

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Reviewed by 1 customer

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5.0

STUNNING

By The Gnome

from CAMBRIDGESHIRE

Pros

  • Accurate Instructions
  • Attractive
  • Hardy
  • Healthy
  • Lightweight
  • Versatile

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Garden
    • Patio

    Comments about Crocus Aquilegia chrysantha'Yellow Queen':

    This plant is stunning when it flowers. It works well either on it's own (in a container on the patio) or where it can be seen easily in a border. The soft yellow of the flowers along with the mid green of the leaves is very eye catching and the flowers just keep on multiplying.

    • Your Gardening Experience:
    • Experienced

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    If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
    1 Question | 2 Answers
    Displaying question 1
    • Q:

      Growing plants for a wedding

      Dear Crocus, I am a very happy customer ..... I love your site, plants and service. I learnt about you first from Arabella Lennox-Boyd. But now I am writing for some advice please. My sister is getting married in Oxfordshire on the last weekend of May. I would love to grow the flowers for the wedding. I have a big garden with empty beds and a green house at my disposal. Could you give me some advice on types of cut flowers that would be in bloom at the end of May? Some pointers as a place to start my research and buying would be fantastic. Thank you very much, Best wishes, Kate
      Asked on 8/1/2010 by Kate Olivia Higginbottom

      2 answers

      • A:

        Hello Kate, It will be a little hit and miss as a lot will depend on the weather, but the following plants should be in flower around that time. Choisya ternata
        http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/choisya-ternata-/classid.825/
        Osmanthus x burkwoodii
        http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/osmanthus-%C3%97-burkwoodii-/classid.4171/
        Syringa http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.syringa/
        Viburnum x carlcephalum
        http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/viburnum-%C3%97-carlcephalum-/classid.4460/
        Convallaria majalis
        http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.convallaria/ Iris
        http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.iris/ Paeonia
        http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.paeonia/ Euphorbia palustris
        http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/euphorbia-palustris-/classid.2794/
        Aquilegia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.aquilegia/
        Ceanothus Skylark
        http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/ceanothus-thyrsiflorus-skylark/classid.728/
        and if we have a hot start to the summer a couple of roses or some of the earlier lavenders may have started too. I hope this gives you lots of ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

        Answered on 8/1/2010 by Kate Olivia Higginbottom
      • A:

        Thank you so much Helen - amazing! I'll send you photos of the finished results. Best wishes and thanks again, Kate

        Answered on 8/1/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
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    Aquilegias - nectar-rich and lovely

    These cottage garden essentials take their name from Aquila, Latin for eagle, because the nectar-rich spurs at the back of the flower resemble eagle's talons. Their other common name, columbine, is also related to a bird. If you turn the flowers upside d

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