2.5kg box £9.99
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Buy Vitax Q4 fertiliser: An outstanding general purpose fertiliser, supplied in easy to use pellets, Vitax Q4 contains all the plant foods and trace elements essential for vigorous growth, abundant flowering and ripening of fruit. Simply apply the recommended quantity to moist soil and lightly hoe in.<br><br>For roses, mix Vitax Q4 with the soil prior to planting and use as an annual dressing every spring. For flowers and vegetables, apply prior to planting and top dress vegetables once or twice during the growing season. For tomatoes and chrysanthemums, apply prior to planting and then as a regular feed at 3 to 4 weekly intervals.<br><br> NPK: 5.3-7.5-10 + Trace Elements.

An outstanding general purpose fertiliser, supplied in easy to use pellets, Vitax Q4 contains all the plant foods and trace elements essential for vigorous growth, abundant flowering and ripening of fruit. Simply apply the recommended quantity to moist soil and lightly hoe in.

For roses, mix Vitax Q4 with the soil prior to planting and use as an annual dressing every spring. For flowers and vegetables, apply prior to planting and top dress vegetables once or twice during the growing season. For tomatoes and chrysanthemums, apply prior to planting and then as a regular feed at 3 to 4 weekly intervals.

NPK: 5.3-7.5-10 + Trace Elements.

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Notes on Vitax Q4 fertiliser

"After winter the rain-washed soil may be short of nutrients. You can add nutrients as well as improve the soil's structure by adding composted manure. Alternatively Vitax Q4 can be used to feed your roses, peonies and fruit. It's a sprinkle-on product that slowly releases food in a balanced ratio of NPK (5.3-7.5-10 + trace elements). This will produce good foliage, good roots and lots of flower power. It comes as a powder or in pelleted form."

Is this product safe for cats and dogs? It was recommended for my star jasmine which I have just planted and is looking yellow. Could you suggest an alternative if not safe for animals. Thanks Annette.

Abeez

Vitax Q4 is not considered a chemically harmful substance so should be fine to use where pets such as cats and dogs have access. In storage it would be advisable to keep the stored (bulk) product away from where pets and children have access as a precaution, but once the product is scattered and applied there is not a problem posed other than the texture of the product being essentially a non-food.

Helen

I have a Peony that does not flower what am i doing wrong

Dave

Peonys often take a couple of years to settle in before they start to flower, so you may need to give it a little more time, but feeding with a high-potash fertiliser like Sulphate of Potash should give it a bit of a push. http://www.crocus.co.uk/product/_/j-arthur-bowers-sulphate-of-potash/cla

Helen

Peonys ften take a couple of years to settle in before they start to flower, so you may need to give it a little more time, but feeding with a high-potash fertiliser like Sulphate of Potash should give it a bit of a push. http://www.crocus.co.uk/product/_/j-arthur-bowers-sulphate-of-potash/classid.1000000181/ use this

Helen

My Peonies used to flower really well but each year they produce less and less flowers - now down to 2/3 flowers per plant. What should I do to encourage more flowers? Thanks, Poppy Tanner

Poppy

Hello, There are a number of reasons why your peony may have stopped producing as many flowers, but the most likely causes are either not enough sun (is something growing up above or around it and blocking the light), or not enough water or nutrients. If there is plenty of sun, you should be able to give it a bit of a push by feeding with a high-potash fertiliser like Sulphate of Potash. http://www.crocus.co.uk/product/_/j-arthur-bowers-sulphate-of-potash/classid.1000000181/

Helen

My Cornus has not flowered? I have a dogwood - Cornus 'Eddies White Wonder' and it has not flowered. Can you tell me why?

B Homer

Hello There, It is not unusual for these plants to take a few years to settle in before they start to produce flowers so you may need a little patience - but once they start they are well worth the wait. You can help them along by making sure they get lots of sun, and feed them with a good general purpose fertilise during the growing season.

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