Vinca collection

1 collection £41.94 £24.99
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Buy Vinca collection periwinkle collection: Reliable flowering groundcover

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: any but very dry soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: April to September
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Undemanding and versatile, these low-growing evergreens will produce showy flowers intermittently for several months after their initial flush in mid-spring. Originating from forest floors throughout Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia, they are tolerant of most soils provided they are not too dry, and are valuable for providing pretty ground cover in sun or shade.

    In each collection you will receive two of each of the following varieties, each in a 9cm pot.

  • Vinca minor 'Atropurpurea':Pairs of dark green leaves develop along the long trailing stems, eventually creating a dense mat of rich green foliage that can be used to help keep weeds at bay. The 5-petalled flowers, which appear on long stalks, are a rich shade of plum-purple. Grows to 20cm.

  • Vinca minor 'Gertrude Jekyll':If grown in a reasonably sunny position, this lesser periwinkle will provide an abundant show of pure white flowers, which contrast well with the deep green leaves. A compact form, it is suitable for growing in pots, or for filling gaps at the front of a border. Grows to 10cm.

  • Vinca minor 'La Grave':Larger than average, salverform flowers form in the leaf axils of the slender stems. Their lavender-blue colouring mixes well with most shades of pink, purple and blue, while the plants prostrate habit will add structural diversity to ferns and hostas. Grows to 20cm.

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Vinca collection - what is the size of this collection? The description is not really clear about that.

Kim

Hello, Each collection contains one of each of the three listed cultivars (ie. 3 plants), which are growing in 9cm pots.

Helen

Hi, we have a steep sunny bank at the back of our garden, it is in full sun most of the day and gets very dry. The soil is very poor lots of stones ect. Can you please recommend any ground cover plants we can use that are quick growing as when it is dug over any soil is washed down to the bottom as soon as we get any rain. Many thanks Christine.

DingDong

Hello Christine, I'm afraid you will struggle to get anything established here as even the most drought-tolerant plant will need to be gradually weaned off the regular supply of water that it has received in a nursery. If however you can dig in loads of composted organic matter and make sure everything is kept really well watered, then you could try the following. Stachys http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/stachys-byzantina-silver-carpet/classid.2000015685/ Alchemilla http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/alchemilla-mollis/classid.2000025906/ Erigeron http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/erigeron-karvinskianus/classid.2751/

Helen

What size pot do the vinca collection come in...

T

Hello there These vincas come in 9cm pots. Hope this helps.

What plants are suitable as ground-cover under trees (including a lalandi) which give little shade, on a sandy dry soil in coastal Suffolk which is extremely windy.

planter

Hello there This is a difficult situation as the trees and conifers will take most of the moisture and nutrients out of the soil, so the plants will have to be tough. Whichever plants you use, they will need to be kept watered until they get established, and I would try and improve the soil and apply a mulch. Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/pachysandra-terminalis/classid.3288/ Bergenia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.bergenia/sort.0/ Vinca http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.vinca/sort.0/ Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/cotoneaster-dammeri/classid.1021/ Euyonymus fortunei http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.euonymus-fortunei/sort.0/ Hope this helps

Non poisonous plants for pots please Hi I wonder if you can help. I have a Nursery school and am looking for some plants I can plant in pots, that are in a partly sunny, partly shady spot. They have to be plants that aren't poisonous and provide interest over as much of the year as possible. I really like the plants in you ready made border section on the website site, particularly shady pink, sunny pink and keep it cool. Could you please tell me if any of these plants are suitable for my needs? Many Thanks Joanne

Happy Hearts Day Nursery

Hello Joanne, I think your best option would be to opt for mainly evergreen shrubs as these will provide year-round interest. You can then infill with some of the more colourful perennials. As long as the spot does not get too much shade, then here are some of your best options. Hebe http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.hebe/ Vinca http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.vinca/ Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/prices-that-have-been-pruned/pachysandra-terminalis-/classid.3288/ evergreen ferns http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/ferns/plcid.309/vid.228/ Rhododendrons (choose the smaller varieties for pots) http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.rhododendron/start.1/sort.0/cat.plants/ I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Plants to replace a lawn Dear Sir I have a small lawn at the front of my garden and want to use plants other than grass. Can you give me some ideas of plants that could give a low effect of green or some planting scheme that would look ok ? Richard

richard wood

Hello Richard, There are loads of things that you could plant in this area - here are some of the best. Pachysandra http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/prices-that-have-been-pruned/pachysandra-terminalis-/classid.3288/ Lamium http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/lamium-maculatum-beacon-silver/classid.3133/ Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/cotoneaster-dammeri-/classid.1021/ Cotoneaster horizontalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/cotoneaster-horizontalis-/classid.1028/ Ajuga http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.ajuga/ Vinca http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.vinca/ Liriope http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/liriope-muscari-/classid.3173/ Bergenia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.bergenia/ Heuchera http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.heuchera/ Calluna http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.calluna/ Geranium http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/mediterranean-plants/geranium-sanguineum-var.-striatum/classid.2000007127/ I hope this gives you a few ideas, Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Dwarf Hydrangeas Hello I was just wondering if there is such a thing as 'Dwarf' Hydrangeas? If so, are they available in different colours, and how high do they grow? We have a curved walled bed that is about 30' long, and we would like put in some colourful flowering but dwarf plants (about 6-10" high), that require little or no maintenance. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you. Kind regards Rahme

Tim and Rahme

Hello Rahme, I'm afraid there are no Hydrangeas that will stay that small, and most newly planted things will need some maintenance. Having said that here are a couple of plants which might be worth considering Erica http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/heathers/erica-%C3%97-darleyensis-j.w.-porter/classid.567/ Erica http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/heathers/erica-carnea-whitehall/classid.539/ Bergenia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.bergenia/ Vinca http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.vinca/ Ajuga http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.ajuga/ I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Help for a shady damp spot please Hi I'm looking for plants for a damp shady spot in my garden. It's a raised, north-facing bed and stays damp most of the year, and the soil is compost-rich. I'd love to get some colour in there as I look out on to it from my kitchen window so I was wondering about Hollyhocks, Flag Irises or maybe Heuchera? I also have a very big slug problem though - tried Sambucus nigra last year and it was eaten! Please, what can you suggest? I look forward to hearing from you. Kind regards Mary

mary culhane

Hello Mary, Most flowering plants prefer a sunnier spot, and few plants can cope if the soil remains too wet, however you could consider any of the following Alchemilla http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.alchemilla/ Ferns http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/ferns/plcid.309/ Helleborus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.helleborus/ Hydrangea http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.hydrangea/ Persicaria http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.persicaria/ Rhododendron http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.rhododendron/ Vinca http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.vinca/ I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

What can I plant? I have a 1 ft wide border of poor quality soil along the edge of a patio which is adjacent to our neighbour's decking. I was wondering whether you could advise what I could plant. Thanks Anna

Anna Trundle

Hello Anna, Ideally you should dig in as much composted organic matter as possible to enrich the soil before you plant, and then (if you don't mind plants spilling out from the border), you could plant any of the following. Lavandula, Hebe, Hypericum or Vinca.

Crocus Helpdesk

What plants for a neglected patch? Hello, We are trying to improve a rather nasty mud patch in our garden. It is in the shade and the soil is very, very dry - we have had to use a pick axe to turn it over. My question is what types of plants would be suitable for this terrain? Kind Regards, Mark

Mark Siddle

Hello Mark, All plants will need a degree of comfort, so the best thing to do would be to improve the soil by digging in as much organic matter as you can. Once you have done this you can plant tough, low maintenance things like Ajuga, Alchemilla mollia, Aucuba japonica, Berberis, Bergenia, Euonymus fortunei, Lamium, Sarcococca, Skimmia, Viburnum davidii or Vincas. It will be very important though that these are kept really well watered for at least the first year until they have had a chance to become established. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

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