highly scented sweet pea collection

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12 plants £16.99 £13.59
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Buy highly scented sweet pea collection Highly scented sweet pea plant collection: Sweet peas with a knockout scent

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, humus-rich, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average to fast-growing
  • Flowering period: June to September
  • Hardiness: hardy annual

    Sweet peas are enduringly popular climbing annuals, that make excellent cut flowers. The ones in this collection all have a strong scent, which will help fill your garden (and your home if you cut them) with their delicious perfume.

    These sweet peas are autumn sown and grown in root trainers to promote longer deep roots. They have been grown under a cold polythene tunnel and whilst they are hardy, they are still young and do need that extra bit of protection on cold nights for the first few weeks. Wrap them in some good quality horticultural fleece or bring them in to an unheated greenhouse or conservatory for the night.

    In this collection you will receive 4 autumn sown plug plants of each of the following three varieties (12 plug plants in total).

  • Lathyrus odoratus 'Charlie's Angel':Highly scented lavender-blue flowers add an alluring touch to cottage gardens or informal planting schemes, when they can be allowed to scramble over supporting obelisks, arches or trellis. Their soft colouring mixes well with stronger purples, blues and pinks. Height to 1.8m

  • Lathyrus odoratus 'Gwendoline':Creamy-white petals, which look like they have been dipped in pink icing sugar, form luscious sprays of flowers that appear in profusion in summer. This headily-scented variety looks great scrambling over an obelisk or sprawling over a hospitable, neighbouring shrub. Cut the flowers to fill your home with perfume, or leave them outside for the bees buzz about. Height to 1.8m

  • Lathyrus odoratus 'King's High Scent':The delicate picotee colouring of this sweet pea, coupled with the flowers unusually powerful scent, make this a beautiful addition to the flower garden. Where space is at a premium, try filling large pots with them, and top it with a woven obelisk that they can scramble over. Throughout summer you will have a stunning feature for your terrace. Height to 1.8m

  • Garden care: Before planting out, incorporate lots of well-rotted organic matter in the planting hole. Apply a balanced liquid plant food every two weeks while in growth and deadhead regulary to encourage more flowers.

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Eventual height & spread

Summer-long pleasure

5

I hadn't prepared the soil well and had to squeeze these in on a frame which the squirrels use as a highway to the bird-feeder, but those plants which survived my ineptitude - about half of them - have been a delight inside and outside. They look and smell divine, and have lasted much longer than expected. Makes me wonder how good they would be with proper soil preparation and a decent size of frame to climb up (they grow to over 6 feet).

Greenymort

Sheffield

Yes

2000024589

5.0 1

100.0

how many plants would fit comfiortably into a 30cm pot?

well meaning gardener

Hello there We say to plant them about 15cm apart so I would plant 2 in a 30cm pot, but make sure they are well watered and fed. Hope this helps

There seems to be a choice of Tomorite packets. Which is the best one to get please? Do you mix it with the earth?

Carlton

Hello, We sell two Tomorite products. One is a high-potash liquid fertiliser and the other is a gro-bag for growing tomatoes in. The grow bags can be used on their own and do not need to be mixed with anything else.

Helen

What type of soil/compost is best for planting out sweet pea plugs into?

Camgardener

Hello, Sweet peas are heavy feeders, so are best planted into fertile, humus-rich, well-drained soil. If you are growing them in pots, John Innes No2 would be ideal.

Helen

Last year I tried to grow sweet peas. Nightmare! They appear to be delicious to slugs and snails, and the wet summer killed what was left off. 72 plugs planted - the 7 flowers achieved! I Yes, this only individual Blooms. I :-( With the forecast for summer being so bad, is another attempt worth it? I do love sweet pea scented flowers, and am wiling to overlook the straggly and messy appearance of the plant. Any ideas?

Conan the Onanast

Hello, I am sorry to hear you had such a bad experience with your sweet peas last year. I would give them another try, but there are a couple of things that you should be aware of. They will need a spot that gets loads of sun, they are heavy feeders so will need a really rich soil and should be fed with a high potash fertiliser (Tomorite is ideal) and when they do start to flower, they should be picked as this will encourage more to form.

Helen

When should I plant out my Spencer Sweet Pea plugs in the ground please?

Clitheroe kid

Hello, These plugs are raring to go and should be planted out as soon as possible now.

Helen

Hello, Wedding on June 1st, marquee in garden - help! If I keep the Sweet Peas potted up in greenhouse, do you think they may be in flower on June 1st or do you have a better idea to encourage them? Thankyou

Bay Tree

Hello, There is a possibility, although with this cold spring we are having they may need a little extra heat and lots of high potash fertilier (Tomorite) to get them to flower by early June.

Helen

How can I stop rabbits eating sweet peas... and clematis... and the list goes on and on! But I can't live without these two so any ideas!

agapanthus

Hello, These are really troublesome pests, and there are no effective deterrents available (apart from getting a dog) which will be any help to you. They tend to prefer leaves and soft stems rather than flowers and woody stems, and they seem to prefer feeding in exposed positions and often nibble plants at the edge of the border. This habit can be used to the gardener's advantage by planting more valuable subjects (like your sweet peas and Clematis) in the centre of beds. I'm sorry not to be more help,

Helen

Further to the answer re hardiness of sweet peas being hardy annuals, a lot of hardy annuals are sown and grown on under protection so will require some sort of hardening off process before they can safely be planted outside. Does Crocus guarantee that their sweet peas are properly hardened off?

auntyjoan

Hello, Our sweet peas are grown in open ended tunnels. Therefore they are quite open to the elements, are fully hardy and are ready to plant out now.

Helen

How many sweet plants to fill a willow obelisk?

Tina

Hello, It really depends on what size obelisk you opt for. As a rough estimate though, I would say you should plant the seedlings at 15cm intervals around the base of the obelisk. This is quite dense, but it will produce a wonderful display and a mass of summer colour.

Helen

Hello! I have a small south-facing balcony and would like to grow sweetpeas. Is it possible to grow them in pots? Thanks!

Plantnovice

Hello, Sweet peas grow very well in largish pots, provided they are kept well fed and watered.

Helen

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