Pyrus salicifolia 'Pendula'

Pyrus salicifolia 'Pendula'

10 lt pot (1.5-1.8m) £74.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
<ul><li><b>Position:</b> full sun<li><b>Soil:</b> fertile, well-drained soil<li><b>Rate of growth: </b> average<li><b>Flowering period: </b> April and May<li><b>Hardiness: </b> fully hardy<br><br>This small, spreading weeping pear has delicate, weeping branches and silver grey, willow like foliage. In April and May it's covered in creamy white flowers, followed by inedible, green fruit. An ideal specimen tree for small urban gardens, particularly those based on a white or grey colour scheme, it copes well with pollution and alkaline soils.<br><br><li><b>Garden care:</b> In late winter or early spring remove misplaced or crossing branches to build up a healthy, permanent framework.</li></ul>

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: April and May
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    This small, spreading weeping pear has delicate, weeping branches and silver grey, willow like foliage. In April and May it's covered in creamy white flowers, followed by inedible, green fruit. An ideal specimen tree for small urban gardens, particularly those based on a white or grey colour scheme, it copes well with pollution and alkaline soils.

  • Garden care: In late winter or early spring remove misplaced or crossing branches to build up a healthy, permanent framework.

Delivery options
  • Standard £4.99
  • Next / named day £6.99
  • Click & collect FREE
more info

Eventual height & spread

Hi, I love the weeping pear tree and wondered if it is possible to plant them in very large raised beds to act as screening? also how hardy are they and what happens to the foliage during the winter months? Your advise would be much appreciated Many Thanks

Wolfie

Hello, provided the raised beds are large enough, there is no reason why you couldn't plant them up with these beautiful trees. They are fully hardy, so can cope with the worst of the British weather, and they are deciduous, so will lose all their leaves in winter.

Helen

Hi, I'd like to grow one "mushroom shaped". If I cut out the leading trunk at about 8 - 10 ft, would it then stop growing up and allow me to prune to that shape or would new shoots appear that then go upwards (meaning I have to regularly take out the top new shoots)?

waveydavey

Hello, The ones we sell are all top grafted at around 5' in height, so they could easily be grown as an 8 - 10' mushroom shape.

Helen

Hi there, Do you know whether this weeping pear tree would be suitable for planting in a large container ?

Robert

Hello there This lovely tree can grow to 5m x 4m eventually so really it would be better grown in the ground. There are trees that can be grown successfully in containers, as long as the container is large and the tree is kept watered and fed through the growing season. I have attached a link below to the these trees. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/trees/plcid.7/vid.274/ Hope this helps

I just need to check whether the fruit of the weeping silver pear Pyrus salicifolia pendula, although described as 'inedible', will not harm or poison children ? (I am planning to plant in the garden of a cottage rented out in the summer).

Hotwater Bottle

Hello there We go by the RHS guidelines, who do not specify that the fruits of this tree as being poisonous, only inedible. Many garden plants can cause an allergic reaction if eaten so I wouldn't recommend trying them. If you are worried maybe it would be better to choose another tree.

Tree for screening, and a white rose..... Dear Crocus, Please could you advise me? I would like to plant a tree (or other) to screen out the neighbours house. My concern is to find a tree which can be planted near to our house without causing any problems to the building or the patio area. To the side of our house we have a paved path, about 0.5m wide and about 1m of lawn up to the fence. There is sun in the morning and again after about 2pm. I am also looking to find a white rose, long flowering and easy to maintain to reach about 1m high. Sunny position. Our soil is a bit chalky. Hope you can make some suggestions so that I can put my order in online. With thanks, Maria

M Dixon

Hello Maria, Ideally you should aim to plant a tree at least as far away from the house as its eventual height, so if a tree grows to 5m tall at maturity, you should plant it 5m away from your home. This rule however is made to be broken, however you should keep in mind that all large plants have the potential to lift patios or cause damage to unstable walls if the soil is very heavy or the plants get large. Therefore you need to decide if the need for privacy is greater than the risk. If you do decide to go ahead, I would opt for any of the following as they don't tend to become problematic. Acer palmatum cultivars http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.acer-palmatum/ or Pyrus salicifolia Pendula http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/trees/other-trees/deciduous/small-garden-trees/ok-for-small-gardens/pyrus-salicifolia-pendula/classid.4672/ As for the rose, Polar Star is great http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/roses/hybrid-tea-roses/bush-rose/modern-hybrid-t-&amp;-floribunda/rosa-polar-star-=-tanlarpost-pbr/classid.1242/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Please can you help with our choice of trees? Dear Plant Doctor We would really like to get a few blossoming trees in pots on our patio. Ideally these trees would be around 6ft high and non-toxic to our cat.. Their position on the patio would be quite sheltered but they would get some sun throughout the course of the day. We were advised a dwarf apple tree would be suitable but hoped you would have some more ideas. Thanks in advance for your help P.s. We were told about your website from a local gardener who recommended it highly.

matthew sissons

Hello There, I do not have a list of plants which are toxic to cats (perhaps your vet could help you with that), but you could consider any of the following plants, which are happy in really large pots as long as you make sure they are kept well fed and watered Acer palmatum Bloodgood http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/trees/small-garden-trees/ok-for-small-gardens/acer-palmatum-bloodgood/classid.81/ Acer shirasawanum 'Jordan' http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/trees/other-trees/deciduous/small-garden-trees/ok-for-small-gardens/acer-shirasawanum-jordan-pbr/classid.2000018108/ Prunus Snow Showers http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/trees/small-garden-trees/ok-for-small-gardens/prunus-snow-showers/classid.2000018169/ Prunus Kiku Shidare Zakura http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/trees/other-trees/deciduous/small-garden-trees/ok-for-small-gardens/prunus-kiku-shidare-zakura/classid.4643/ Pyrus salicifolia Pendula http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/trees/other-trees/deciduous/small-garden-trees/ok-for-small-gardens/pyrus-salicifolia-pendula/classid.4672/ I hope this gives you a few ideas

Crocus Helpdesk

February pruning of trees, shrubs and climbers

The garden is at its most dormant right now, so it’s a good time to catch up on any pruning missed or forgotten since the autumn. If the weather isn’t favourable, you can leave it for a week or two, but make sure all winter pruning is completed before the

Read full article

January pruning of trees, shrubs and climbers

My gardening resolution this year is to keep on top of my pruning and that means getting out into the garden with my secateurs every month. The garden is at its most dormant right now, so it’s a good time to catch up on any pruning missed or forgotten sin

Read full article

December pruning of trees, shrubs and climbers

My gardening resolution this year is to keep on top of my pruning and that means getting out into the garden with my secateurs every month. The garden is at its most dormant right now, so it’s a good time to catch up on any pruning missed or forgotten sin

Read full article

October pruning of trees, shrubs and climbers

October sees the start of the dormant season which is the best time to prune lots of deciduous garden trees. You can prune newly planted trees to remove any damaged growth and help balance the shape of the canopy as well as maintain a dominant main leader

Read full article