Phlox divaricata subsp. laphamii 'Chattahoochee'

2 litre pot £9.99 £6.99
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Buy Phlox divaricata subsp. laphamii 'Chattahoochee' phlox: Masses of lilac flowers. Perfect in partial shade

This perennial dies back to below ground level each year in autumn, then fresh new growth appears again in spring.

  • Position: partial shade
  • Soil: humus-rich, fertile, moist, well-drained soil, including heavy soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: June
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Pretty carpets of pale to deep lilac-blue flowers appear in June with magenta stars at the centre above hairy, bright green leaves. This compact, spreading, semi-evergreen woodland phlox is one of the loveliest low-growing varieties. Try it en masse at the edge of a border in partial shade, or among deciduous trees. To minimise the incidence of powdery mildew plant in soil that remains moist in summer.

  • Garden care: Phlox are greedy plants, so apply a mulch 5-7cm (2-3in) deep, of well-rotted garden compost or manure in early spring. Shear off the spent flower stems to prevent re-seeding. If the leaves show signs of powdery mildew, cut down to the ground and dispose of the affected foliage, but do not compost it. Clear away the debris around the plant to reduce the chances of reinfection. Lift and divide clumps in autumn and spring.

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Eventual height & spread

My Phlox and Bergamot leaves are browning Hi there I have a Phlox and some Bergamot which I bought from you a while back and whilst it's growing really well, I am finding that the lower leaves on the Phlox are going brown then yellow. I've been taking them off but as it's happening all the the way up the plant, bit by bit, it's going to look quite bare soon! I wondered why they are going yellow, and what I could do about it please? More or less the same with the Bergamot except that the leaves are going brown around the edges. Should I be taking those off and is there anything I could do to prevent it? Many thanks and best wishes Debbie

Deborah Newbury

Hello Debbie, It is quite normal for the older leaves on herbaceous perennials to die off as they are putting on new growth, so I would not be too concerned. Towards the end of summer, they will die back completely and in spring next year the cycle will begin again. If the plants look really tatty, then just remove the older foliage. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

The Chelsea Chop

In the third week of this month you can 'Chelsea chop' your summer-flowering perennials to delay their flowering times. Sedums can be cut back by two thirds to provide lusher foliage, but at the expense of flower.

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