Hydrangea quercifolia Snow Queen ('Flemygea')

Hydrangea quercifolia Snow Queen ('Flemygea')

20% off specimen shrubs
12lt pot (0.5-0.6m) £59.99 £47.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
<ul><br><li><b>Position:</b> full sun or partial shade<li><b>Soil:</b> moist, well-drained, moderately fertile, humus-rich soil<li><b>Rate of growth:</b> average<li><b> Flowering period:</b> July to September<li><b>Hardiness:</b> fully hardy<br><BR>A fantastic hydrangea, with bright green leaves shaped like giant oak leaves and large cones of white flowers in late summer. In autumn, the leaves turn dramatic shades of coral, pink and red, and the flowers fade to pale pink, then brown. A fabulous shrub that gives its best for most of the year. It's best in the middle of a partially shady border, and associates beautifully with most other hydrangeas. <br><BR><li><b>Garden care:</b> Hydrangeas do not like to dry out. In dry weather, soak the roots with a hose and the plant will usually recover. Remove faded flowerheads in spring after the danger of frosts, cutting back the flowered stems to a strong pair of buds. Take out misplaced or diseased shoots. Mulch young plants with a well-rotted manure or compost in spring. Once established, remove a quarter to a third of the shoots to the base of the plant.<BR><BR>


  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: moist, well-drained, moderately fertile, humus-rich soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: July to September
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    A fantastic hydrangea, with bright green leaves shaped like giant oak leaves and large cones of white flowers in late summer. In autumn, the leaves turn dramatic shades of coral, pink and red, and the flowers fade to pale pink, then brown. A fabulous shrub that gives its best for most of the year. It's best in the middle of a partially shady border, and associates beautifully with most other hydrangeas.

  • Garden care: Hydrangeas do not like to dry out. In dry weather, soak the roots with a hose and the plant will usually recover. Remove faded flowerheads in spring after the danger of frosts, cutting back the flowered stems to a strong pair of buds. Take out misplaced or diseased shoots. Mulch young plants with a well-rotted manure or compost in spring. Once established, remove a quarter to a third of the shoots to the base of the plant.

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