Helleborus × hybridus 'Double Ellen Picotee'

hellebore Double Ellen Picotee

4 5 1 star 1 star 1 star 1 star 1 star (3 reviews) Write review
9cm pot £9.99
within 2 weeks
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Buy Helleborus × hybridus 'Double Ellen Picotee' hellebore Double Ellen Picotee: Deligtful flowers with a picotee edge

This perennial is semi-evergreen so it can lose some of its leaves in winter. In colder regions or more exposed gardens, it may lose them all, but then fresh new growth appears again in spring.


  • Position: partial shade
  • Soil: heavy, neutral to alkaline soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: February to April
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Each creamy white petal is variably spotted, and edged with a deep plum-pink, thus creating delightful bi-coloured flowers, which appear in loose cymes. If left undisturbed in the border, the evergreen foliage will form dense, slowly expanding clumps.

  • Garden care: Add lots of well-rotted leaf mould or organic matter to the planting hole. Cut the old leaves back down to the ground in January or February as this will show off the new emerging flowers to best effect. It will also help to get rid of foliar diseases such as Hellebore leaf spot. Apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted organic matter around the base of the plant in autumn and provide a top-dressing of general fertiliser each spring. Cut off the seed heads to prevent inferior seedlings colonising.

  • Harmful if eaten/skin irritant
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Eventual height & spread

Beautiful winter colour!

5

I love helebores this time of year when the garden is otherwise bare so bought this to cheer my daughter up following a miscarriage to mark the "due date" of her baby

Welsh Lady 53

North Wales

true

So delicate, wonderful plant

4

Near the path

Gardener di

Norfolk

true

Unusual shaded colouring

3

The flowers have a pretty, slightly faded look - think faded elegance. However, the plant barely survived into a second season and has not yet flowered a second time.

AnneS

Bristol

false

2000020328

4.0 3

66.7

Heavenly helleborus

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