Award-winning snowdrop collection

Award-winning snowdrop collection

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2+1 FREE collections £40.41 £26.94
within 3 weeks
1 collection £13.47
within 3 weeks
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Award-winning snowdrop collection Award-winning snowdrop collection: Buy 2 collections for £26.94 and get another collection FREE

Buy the collection of 35 bulbs (see below for quantities of each variety) for £13.47, or buy 2 collections for £26.94 and get another collection free


  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: well-drained soil
  • Flowering period: spring
  • Hardiness: fully hardy



    Galanthus nivalis
    It's hard not to love these wonderful bulbs for adding colour to the garden when little else is awake. The nodding white flowers have a small green marking on the inside of each tepal, are honey scented, and appear in late winter. They look particularly good planted in large drifts in grass where they will naturalise quite happily. Alternatively plant them up in clumps in the front of mixed borders, or into pots so they can be admired close up. Plant the bulbs as soon as possible after delivery to prevent the bulbs drying out. Grows up to 10cm tall. 15 bulbs per collection

    Galanthus woronowii
    This variety has been grown in the UK for around 100 years, but originates from a wide range of habitats in north-eastern Turkey and southern Russia. It can be found naturalised in forests, fields, ditches, grassy meadows as well as rocky gorges, scree and stony slopes. Because of its wide range of natural habitats, it is a pretty tough customer and can be grown just about anywhere. It has a basal rosette of chunky green leaves that are waxy to the touch, and from their centre emerges a single stem bearing the delicate white flower which has a small green mark on the inner segments. Grows up to 15cm tall. 10 bulbs per collection

    Galanthus elwesii
    Bulbous perennials providing the first brave flowers of the year. Snowdrops signify that spring is just waiting to unfold and gardeners should take heart. Their name comes from the Greek words 'gala', meaning milk, and 'anthos', meaning flower. Robust and tolerant of most soil types, wild snowdrops are commonly found on wooded upland and rocky outcrops throughout Europe and Western Asia, generally flowering from January to March. Grows up to 20cm tall. 10 bulbs per collection

    Buy the collection of snowdrop bulbs - 35 bulbs, see above for quantities of each for only £13.47. Or buy 2 collections for £26.94 and we will send you another collection absolutely free. That's 105 bulbs in total - saving £13.47.

  • CAUTION do not eat ornamental bulbs
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