Diervilla sessilifolia 'Butterfly'

Diervilla sessilifolia 'Butterfly'

1.5 litre pot £9.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
<ul><li><b>Position:</b> full sun or partial shade<li><b>Soil:</b> fertile, well-drained<li><b>Rate of growth:</b> average<li><b>Flowering period:</b> May to June<li><b>Hardiness:</b> fully hardy<br><br>Copper-flushed green leaves emerge in spring on the gracefully arching, reddish stems. From early summer these are accompanied by clusters of small, trumpet-shaped yellow flowers, which turn a coral colour as they mature, and act as a magnet to butterflies. This suckering deciduous shrub is tough, and once established will tolerate dry conditions in full sun or partial shade. It is ideal for planting in wilder areas where it can spread, or in woodland gardens as an under-storey filler.<br><br><li><b>Garden care:</b> Cut back to a low, permanent framework each spring as the buds are beginning to swell, and apply a generous layer of mulch around the base of the plant.</li></ul>

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, well-drained
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: May to June
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Copper-flushed green leaves emerge in spring on the gracefully arching, reddish stems. From early summer these are accompanied by clusters of small, trumpet-shaped yellow flowers, which turn a coral colour as they mature, and act as a magnet to butterflies. This suckering deciduous shrub is tough, and once established will tolerate dry conditions in full sun or partial shade. It is ideal for planting in wilder areas where it can spread, or in woodland gardens as an under-storey filler.

  • Garden care: Cut back to a low, permanent framework each spring as the buds are beginning to swell, and apply a generous layer of mulch around the base of the plant.

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