black mulberry

black mulberry / Morus nigra

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10 litre pot (bush) £99.99
available to order from autumn
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy black mulberry black mulberry / Morus nigra : Heart-shaped leaves and edible fruit

This plant is deciduous so it will lose all its leaves in autumn, then fresh new foliage appears again each spring.

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: slow-growing
  • Flowering period: May to June
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    A stately tree with heart-shaped leaves and delicious, slightly acidic raspberry-like fruit in late summer. The black mulberry is a long lived tree and is perfect for growing as a specimen as it has a more attractive shape than the white mulberry, with low gnarled branches. This also makes it easier to pick the sweet fruit, though it will take a number of years before it starts to produce its bumper crop. Keep in mind that these plants generally take around 7-10 years to produce fruit and ours are already 3-4 years old.

  • Garden care: Prepare the ground well before planting. Plant in full sun out of cold, drying winds. Stake for the first few years and prune in winter, as the trees 'bleed' at other times of the year. Little pruning is needed however, only to remove low, dead, diseased or crossing branches.

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Eventual height & spread

I have had a mulberry for at least the last 12 years and it has never fruited though it seems to produce small flowers . it is in full sun in clay soil and looks healthy and is now quite some height and spreaed - 2 * 1.2 m - what do i need to do to encourage fruit? should i prune it ? does it need more mulching /manure or a graft on the bark? is it true they need a male and female to fruit?

spud

Hello there Mulberry trees are self fertile having male and female flowers on one plant so if it is flowering, it should be fruiting unless the tree is stressed in some way. Maybe it is not getting enough water or lacking nutrients in some way? You could give it a feed in late winter with Growmore or fish, blood and bone, apply a mulch in the spring with a well rotted manure around the base of the tree and make sure it doesn't dry out. http://www.crocus.co.uk/product/_/j-arthur-bowers-bowers-growmore/classid.1000000175/ http://www.crocus.co.uk/product/_/j-arthur-bowers-fish-blood-and-bone/classid.200334/ Hope this helps

How tall will the Mulberry be when it arrives in a 10 Lt pot?

supermum

Hello, Each one is slightly different, but most ill be around 1.5 - 1.8m tall.

helen

When will the Mulberry tree produce fruit and which variety is best? I am interested in purchasing a Mulberry tree,- I believe that it is a few years before they start to produce large, edible fruit. Can you please advise how many years this would be? Your Mulberry trees are in 10 litre pots, what is the average age of the plants i.e. 3 years, 5 years etc? My mother has had a Mulberry tree (not sure of the variety) for approx 10 years and the fruits are so small they can not be picked, is there a variety that bears larger fruit or do they need to be very old trees?

Joanne Ratcliffe

Mulberries usually start fruiting when they are about 10 years old. The ones we sell in 10 litre pots are 3 to 4 years old so will take around 6 - 7 years to start producing a bumper crop of berries. The best species for edible fruit is Morus nigra, black mulberry which we sell on our site. http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=4602&CategoryID=

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