Strulch organic garden mulch

1 x 100 litre bag £8.99 Buy
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6 x 100 litre bags £53.94 £48.99 Buy
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All you can buy delivered for £4.99
Strulch is a light and easy to use garden mulch made from wheat straw for organic gardening. A patented process is used to 'preserve' the straw so that it lasts for up to two years and gives an earthy brown colour. As slugs and snails do not like the texture of this strulch this now comes complete with added minerals to ensure those pesky slug and snails stay away from your beds and borders for even longer.

Strulch has a neutral pH and can be used throughout the garden on borders, raised beds, around cultivated fruit and on vegetable plots.
  • Spend less time weeding as Strulch reduces weed growth by up to 95%.
  • Save water as Strulch helps retain moisture around plants
  • Improve your soil as Strulch enriches soil and its structure
  • Use all around the garden as Strulch is suitable for use around flowers,shrubs, fruit and vegetables.
  • Save time and money as Strulch, the mineralised straw garden mulch, lasts up to two years, spreading the cost, saving water and fertiliser, making your plants grow healthier and stronger and giving you more time to relax.
  • 100 litre bag will cover approx 3 square metres.


Please note: As a precaution please use gloves when handling. The packed product may contain traces of iron which will be absorbed by the straw after spreading. Keep away from sources of ignition when dry.

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