Strulch organic garden mulch

1 x 100 litre bag £8.99 Buy
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6 x 100 litre bags £53.94 £48.99 Buy
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All you can buy delivered for £4.99
Strulch is a light and easy to use garden mulch made from wheat straw for organic gardening. A patented process is used to 'preserve' the straw so that it lasts for up to two years and gives an earthy brown colour. As slugs and snails do not like the texture of this strulch this now comes complete with added minerals to ensure those pesky slug and snails stay away from your beds and borders for even longer.

Strulch has a neutral pH and can be used throughout the garden on borders, raised beds, around cultivated fruit and on vegetable plots.
  • Spend less time weeding as Strulch reduces weed growth by up to 95%.
  • Save water as Strulch helps retain moisture around plants
  • Improve your soil as Strulch enriches soil and its structure
  • Use all around the garden as Strulch is suitable for use around flowers,shrubs, fruit and vegetables.
  • Save time and money as Strulch, the mineralised straw garden mulch, lasts up to two years, spreading the cost, saving water and fertiliser, making your plants grow healthier and stronger and giving you more time to relax.
  • 100 litre bag will cover approx 3 square metres.


Please note: As a precaution please use gloves when handling. The packed product may contain traces of iron which will be absorbed by the straw after spreading. Keep away from sources of ignition when dry.

There are currently no 'goes well with' suggestions for this item.

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
Strulch organic garden mulch
 
4.2

(based on 5 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (3)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (0)

80%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Easy to use (5)
  • Organic (5)
  • Long lasting (3)

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Flower gardens (4)
    • Potted plants (3)

    Reviewed by 5 customers

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    Displaying reviews 1-5

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    (0 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

     
    3.0

    Looks Good

    By Hayjl

    from Lancashire

    Pros

    • Easy to Use
    • Long Lasting
    • Organic

    Cons

    • Attracts Cats
    • Not A Slugsnail Solution
    • Weeds

    Best Uses

    • Beds

    Comments about Strulch organic garden mulch:

    I used on all my flower beds in my front and back garden in the hope that slugs, snails and weeds wouldnt like it but unfortunately thats not the case. Within a week or 2 weeds were sprouting through the thick layer that I had spread and the slugs and snails were happily sliding across to get to my plants. Even worse, the local cats think it makes my beds into a great litter tray and I am constantly spotting new mounds of it after a cat has been! It does look really nice as a ground covering and its possible its doing the soil some good (I can't be sure of that)but, as it doesn't achieve the other things it says it will, I think its overpriced

    Comment on this review

    (0 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

     
    3.0

    Not slug replent.

    By Tropical22

    from Cheshire

    Pros

    • Easy to Use
    • Organic

    Cons

    • Weeds

    Best Uses

    • Flower Gardens
    • Potted Plants
    • Vegetable Gardens

    Comments about Strulch organic garden mulch:

    This is an very good mulch. It is easy to apply. Keeps in moisture and soil/roots warmer. It does need re-applying at intervals. But it has flaws. A bag does not go very far in area. So you will need several bags at least. Weeds do grow through it. And above all it clearly states that it is slug repellent. which it is definitely Not. My Lupins, Hemerocallis and Hydrangeas to name a few plants have thick layers of this mulch around the base of the plants, but have still been demolished by slugs this Summer. As I purchased it to avoid this happening I can only give it 3 stars.

    • Your Gardening Experience:
    • Experienced

    Comment on this review

     
    5.0

    Possibly my favourite garden product

    By Anne

    from London

    Pros

    • Easy to Use
    • Organic
    • Suppresses Weeds
    • Water-saving

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Flower Gardens
      • Potted Plants
      • Raised Beds
      • Vegetable Gardens

      Comments about Strulch organic garden mulch:

      I honestly don't know what I would do without Strulch. I apply it to my raised vegetable beds, flower beds and pots every year. It retains moisture in the soil, greatly reducing the need for watering, and it keeps the weeds down. Weeds do still grow to some extent, but are much easier to spot and remove. Strulch also gives the beds a neat finish. After a year or so, the Strulch breaks down and adds organic matter to the soil. In my veg beds, I often apply a thick layer of Strulch then make channels or holes in which to sow seeds. This makes it much easier to keep the areas between rows or plants free from weeds. Alternatively you can plant out seedlings then apply the Strulch around them, making sure it doesn't touch the stems.

      • Your Gardening Experience:
      • Experienced

      Comment on this review

       
      5.0

      Excellent product

      By Crabhead

      from Bedfordshire

      Pros

      • Easy to Use
      • Long Lasting
      • Organic

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Flower Gardens

        Comments about Strulch organic garden mulch:

        Excellent product, unlike bark chippings the birds don't throw stulch everywhere. Looks good, smells good and stops the weeds.

        • Your Gardening Experience:
        • Keen but clueless

        Comment on this review

        (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

         
        5.0

        Brilliant stuff!

        By Bofalot

        from St Albans

        Pros

        • Attractive
        • Easy to Use
        • Long Lasting
        • Organic

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Flower Gardens
          • Potted Plants

          Comments about Strulch organic garden mulch:

          We spread this evenly over a couple of new flower borders when first created 2 years ago - very impressed! In the two years the number of weeds appearing has been MASSIVELY reduced, and those weeds that do make a go of it are already weakened and easy to pull up by hand (no need for the daisy grubber or trowel!). Plants that previously stuggled have flourished with more consistent moisture, and slug and snail damage has been reduced. This year we are using Strulch over all our borders!

          • Your Gardening Experience:
          • Keen but clueless

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          Do you want to ask a question about this?

          If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
          12 Questions | 14 Answers
          Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
          • Q:

            When is the best to apply Strulch?
            Asked on 9/25/2013 by MillyMulch from Retford

            1 answer

            • Plant Doctor

              A:

              Hello,

              Strulch can be applied at any time of the year, but I suppose the most popular times would be Spring or Autumn.

              Answered on 9/26/2013 by Helen from Crocus
          • Q:

            Dear Plant Doctor,
            My laurocerasus rotundiflora have never flowered in six years. A couple of years ago i saw the buds beginning to grow. What should i do to encourage the white flowers to grow. I have never added mulch around the hedge which is in my front garden which does not have a garden wall.
            Asked on 7/6/2013 by Fabriella from Buckhurst Hill, Essex

            1 answer

            • Plant Doctor

              A:

              Hello,

              There are a number of reasons why plants don't flower. These include too much shade or not enough water or nutrients. It can also be caused by the plant putting on new root growth instead of focusing its energies on producing flowers. I am not really sure why yours have not produced buds, but given time and the right conditions, there is no reason why they wont. You can often give them a bit of a push by feeding during the growing season with a high potash fertiliser.

              Answered on 7/9/2013 by Helen from Crocus
          • Q:

            Is Strulch pet friendly with there being added minerals
            Asked on 3/8/2013 by potty from yorkshire

            2 answers

            • A:

              Not sure about safety, but the best thing about Strulch for me is that my neighbours' cats HATE it. This is enough to make me keep buying it every year!

              Answered on 3/29/2014 by Mrs H from Hertfordshire
            • Plant Doctor

              A:

              Hello,

              This product has not been tested on animals, however the manufacturers have both dogs and cats in their garden and they have never heard of it causing any problems. It is made of straw and is not designed to be eaten, but it contains less that 1% iron minerals and the same organic preservatives that they use in bread, so it seems very unlikely that there is anything in it that would harm your pets.

              Answered on 3/8/2013 by Helen from Crocus
          • Q:

            Can this be used for clematis and general plants. I have 2 raised beds that were constructed over builders rubble a year ago. I have used usual potting compost, but I think the soil needs some sort of manure.
            Asked on 2/8/2013 by Bunty from Isle of Wight

            1 answer

          • Q:

            Moving a Rhododendron

            Please can you tell me, when is the best time to move a Rhododendron? I live in West Sussex. Many thanks. Beverly
            Asked on 2/14/2010 by Anonymous

            1 answer

            • A:

              Hello Beverley, The best time to move established shrubs is in the autumn when the soil is still warm but the plant isn't in full active growth. Begin by marking a circle around the shrub, as wide as the widest branch. Dig a trench along the line of this circle. Use a fork to loosen the soil around the root ball as you go to reduce its size and weight so that it becomes manageable. When the root ball looks about the right size that you can still move it but there are still a lot of roots intact, begin to under cut the root ball with a sharp spade to sever the biggest woody roots. Roll up the root ball in sacking or plastic to protect the roots from damage and drying out. Move the shrub to a pre determined position. It is important to have the site ready so that you can transplant the shrub at once and it isn't left for hours (or worse!) drying out. Remove the sacking and plant the shrub in the new hole, at the depth at which it was previously planted. Firm well, water well and mulch with a good thick layer of well rotted farmyard manure. Helen Plant Doctor

              Answered on 2/15/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
          • Q:

            Can I use Rootgrow on established Roses?

            Can Rootgrow be usefully used on established roses? If not, please could you advise me as to what I should use on them at this time of year, to help next year's flowering? Sarah
            Asked on 11/19/2009 by Sarah Craig

            2 answers

            • A:

              Thankyou for your suggestion that I apply composted organic matter to my roses. I will do this. Sarah

              Answered on 11/20/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
            • A:

              Hello Sarah, Rootgrow should only really be used when you are first
              planting as it needs to come into contact with the roots. At this time
              of the year the best thing you can do for established roses is apply a
              generous layer of composted organic matter as a mulch. I hope this
              helps. Helen Plant Doctor

              Answered on 11/20/2009 by Sarah Craig
          • Q:

            Tree Fern winter care

            Hi, I bought a Tree Fern a few years back and it seems to be establishing quite well. I have it in a semi-shaded spot, and I ensure that it is watered and fed regularly. Each year around this time, I protect it for the winter by stuffing straw in the crown, tying up the fading fronds around it and wrapping the trunk in fleece. The only thing is in the spring/summer it tends to produce what I think is a meagre amount of new fronds - 5 or 6 at the most. How can I encourage it to produce a greater number of large and healthy fronds? Also are the fronds prone to wind or sun damage, as the fronds on my tree this year looked like they were burned and shrived at the tips and dry to the touch. Your advise would be greatly appreciated. Thanks and Regards Steve
            Asked on 11/3/2009 by Steve Crawford

            1 answer

            • A:

              Hello Steve, If the fronds are dry, then it is either getting scorched by too much sun or wind, or it needs more water. I think the key to success is to make sure it can spread its roots, so plant it out in a sheltered part of the garden if it is still in a pot. Also and even more importantly, when you water really soak the whole length of the stem as this is covered by aerial roots - this should be done pretty regularly in summer, but not so the soil below is constantly wet. They do not need much feeding though, so just a top dressing of chicken manure or mulch in spring will do. Finally I live in central London and mine just gets a couple of handfuls of leaves in the crown in autumn and they seem to cope with the weather - including some quite heavy snow at times. I leave the fronds on and only cut them off when new growth emerges each spring. If you live in a colder part of the country then you will need to protect it a little more, but make sure air can circulate and water can get through. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

              Answered on 11/4/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
          • Q:

            My Honeysuckle is losing leaves

            I have a Honeysuckle climbing over an arch, it is putting on loads of growth, but it is shedding a lot of leaves all the time. What do I do please?
            Asked on 6/10/2006 by margaret_stokes

            1 answer

            • A:

              Plants tend to shed leaves when they are stressed, and the most common reason for this is drought. Apply a mulch around the base of the plant with well-rotted organic matter, as this will help improve the soil moisture and feed the plant too.

              Answered on 6/12/2006 by Crocus
          • Q:

            How do I prevent Pear midge?

            My pear tree suffered from what I think I have correctly identified as 'pear midge' last summer and I lost the whole crop. I collected and destroyed the affected fruit, and in March this year pruned the tree as it was needed. What do I need to do to prevent this happening again this year? I would prefer an organic or wildlife friendly approach as a lot of birds frequent my friut trees, and the pears are also usually enjoyed by family and friends.
            Asked on 4/19/2005 by Ann Williams

            1 answer

            • A:

              There are a few ways you can tackle pear midge that doesn't involve spraying lots of chemicals. The best way is to remove infested fruit. This helps to reduce pest levels, and hopefully to guarantee a crop in future seasons. Pick off any affected fruitlets as soon as they are noticed. You can also place a barrier on the soil under the tree canopy to catch falling larvae and fruits. This could be a plastic sheet, or thick cardboard to prevent larvae reaching the soil. Sweep up all fallen debris daily and put it in the dustbin. Keep the ground under the trees covered with a mulch which should be removed each autumn and renewed in the spring. Larval cocoons will be removed with the mulch at the end of each season. In winter, lightly fork or hoe the soil under the trees to expose cocoons to predators, but take care not to damage any shallow tree roots. Pear midge lay their eggs in mid-spring so very early or very late flowering varieties of pear may escape damage. Early flowering varieties are also prone to frost damage so choose a late-flowering variety such as ???Concorde??? or ???Onward???.

              Answered on 4/20/2005 by Crocus
          • Q:

            Why isn't my Magnolia flowering?

            I planted a Magnolia stellata 4 yrs ago. It has flowered every year so far, but has not produced flower buds this year - only leaves. It is in a fairly sheltered location, with poor, sandy soil which has been well-improved with organic compost and mulch. Any ideas ?
            Asked on 4/18/2005 by Andy Bills

            1 answer

            • A:

              If the plant gets plenty of sun, then it sounds like the plant just needs a really good feed to help encourage new growth and flower buds. You do need to mulch the plant every year with organic matter, and a feed in spring with a slow-release general fertiliser will help too. A little extra potash (sulphate of potash) in spring will also help encourage flower formation, while in autumn you can feed with bonemeal to help encourage good root growth. Don't forget to keep the plant well watered too in dry weather.

              Answered on 4/19/2005 by Crocus
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