J. Arthur Bowers cocoa shell mulch

50 litre bag £13.99 Email me when in stock
All you can buy delivered for £4.99
Cocoa shell mulch is perfect for suppressing weeds and holding moisture in beds and borders, and is a natural by-product of chocolate manufacturing.

It rots down gradually, improving the structure of the soil but will need topping up every few years. Once the cocoa shell has been spread over the borders and has got wet, it will form a crust which binds it together. This crust will help prevent slug and snail attack.

Each bag covers approximately 1.5 square metres at a depth of 5 cm

Please note: Cocoa shell contains the naturally occurring substance theobromine. If eaten by dogs, this can be very harmful. Please keep your dog away from the treated area until the mulch has settled i.e. a couple of weeks. If you are still concerned, please contact your local vet.
A white mould occasionally appears on cocoa shell when first applied this soon disappears as the cocoa shell starts to form the crust which binds it together.

There are currently no 'goes well with' suggestions for this item.

 

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4 Questions | 4 Answers
Displaying questions 1-4
  • Q:

    I have used this mulch in a formal garden area and it was great; if I use it in an informal setting will it prevent self-seeding annuals from germinating (e.g. California poppies, forget me nots etc)? My light sandy soil desperately needs nutrition but I don't want to lose the free plants!
    Asked on 4/26/2014 by Jonesy from London/Essex borders

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      This mulch does bind together in time and will form a sort of crust that will help prevent seedlings germinating. I would not say that the problem will be completely eradicated, but it certainly will help.

      Answered on 4/30/2014 by helen from crocus
  • Q:

    This may sound a bit daft but will bulbs grow through the cocoa shell mulch in spring? I have an expanse of bare earth which I am going to plant up and I also want to plant bulbs and put mulch on to keep weeds down etc. I haven't bought any mulch yet and have struggled to find any but this looks quite suitable. Many thanks.
    Asked on 9/22/2013 by plainjane from Nottingham

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello there
      Yes it is fine to use a cocoa mulch as bulbs will come up through it. Spread a 5cm layer around plants or across the soil, leaving a little gap around the stems of any plants.
      However please note Cocoa shell contains the naturally occurring substance theobromine which if eaten by dogs, can be very harmful, so keep your dog away from the treated area until the mulch has settled i.e. a couple of weeks or check with your local vet.
      Hope thgis helps

      Answered on 9/23/2013 by Georgina from Crocus
  • Q:

    Can I use Cocoa Shell Mulch on acid-loving plants?

    Hello, I wonder of you could help me with a couple of quick queries that I have please? I bought some Cocoa shell mulch from you a couple of weeks ago. Is this ok to use with acid-loving plants like Azaleas? Best wishes Eleanor
    Asked on 6/24/2009 by Paterson, Eleanor

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Eleanor, Cocoa shell mulch would be ideal for your acid loving plants as it has a pH of around 5.8. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 6/26/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Cocca shells

    For the last 2 years I have put cocoa shell at the bottom of my parrots aviary (on the advise of my vet Alan Jones from the Parrots Society, because it is soft and clean). I used to purchase the bags from Homebase. However recently I have found inside their bags the cocoa shell were rotten. Are your bags kept dry ? (damp cocoa shells within plastic do develop problems) Thanks
    Asked on 10/17/2006 by Pat

    1 answer

    • A:

      Good morning Thank you for your e-mail. I have spoken to our buyers with regard to your e-mail and I regret that as this product is stored outside we could not guarantee that it would be completely dry. Many apologies for any disappointment this may cause.

      Answered on 10/18/2006 by Crocus
Displaying questions 1-4

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