Taxus baccata

English yew

3 litre pot £11.99 Buy
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1 year guarantee

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: any fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: slow-growing
  • Other features: yellow, male cones in spring; female plants produce fleshy, cup-shaped, bright red autumn fruits; all parts of the plant are highly toxic if ingested
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    To find out more about how to plant a hedge, click here

    Needle-like, dark green leaves on horizontal branches and fleshy, cup-shaped, bright-red autumn fruits on female plants. The dark green foliage of this slow-growing, evergreen conifer provides an excellent background for shrub and herbaceous borders. Broadly conical in shape, it's tolerant to dry shade, chalky and acid soils and urban pollution. English yew makes a fabulous formal hedge.

  • Garden care: Trim or renovate in summer or early autumn.

  • CAUTION toxic if eaten

Iris 'Black Swan'

bearded iris

Sumptuous dark purple, bearded flowers

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Buxus sempervirens

common box - cone

Ideal for a formal garden

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Camellia japonica 'Nobilissima'

camellia

Early flowering, with white blooms

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Daphne odora 'Aureomarginata'

daphne

Deliciously fragrant flowers

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6 Questions | 6 Answers
Displaying questions 1-6
  • Q:

    Help with plants for N/East facing garden

    Hi, I have a little problem choosing some plants....... I really like the look and size of the 'Shady Pink' pre-designed corner planting plan, but our problem is that we have a north east facing garden, so we get no sun at all in the winter, and direct sun for only half a day on either side of the garden during the summer. Would this planting plan be suitable for that level of shade? We are actually are buying plants for the entire garden, so we'd need about 6 new shrubs, and maybe a small tree (we were thinking about the Prunus Amanogawa). Could you please help us with a few shrubs that would do well in these conditions? For perennials, we have been recommended; - Geranium Johnson's Blue, Kniphofia, Crocosmia, and Helleborus foetidus. Are these suitable? Many many thanks! Regards, Josee
    Asked on 4/12/2010 by Josee Mallet

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Josee, It is always difficult to give a definitive answer to the shade issue, but looking at the Shady Pink border, the most shade tolerant plants include Anemone hupehensis Hadspen Abundance, Thalictrum aquilegiifolium and Dryopteris erythrosora. If you click on the following link it will take you to all our shade-loving shrubs http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/plcid.1/vid.11/ and for the shade -loving perennials http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/plcid.2/vid.11/ Of the plants you have listed, the Prunus, Helleborus foetidus, Kniphofia and Crocosmia will be OK as long as there is more sun than shade. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 4/13/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Plant advice for 2 new beds please

    Hello, I need some help to decide which plants to put into two new areas please:- 1: A semi-circle flash bed at the front of the house, size approx 2m x 0.80m and 0.80m deep. I thought about the 3 following options for a small tree/bush in the middle:- a) Magnolia soulangeana, but I was worried about the size that it could grow to and possible problems with roots etc . Will it stay small if the size of the container is used to restrict it? b) Witch Hazel (Hamamelis intermediana 'Diane'). Will it spread too much? I think this is very pretty. c) Corylus avellana 'contorta' Then I also need to think about ground cover plants to help suppress weeds. I am only interested in fully hardy, easy to look after plants, could be with some flowers or coloured leaves. 2:- A thin path between neighbours (approx 2m x 0.40). My idea is to plant bamboo. I would love a modern thin run of bamboo with ground cover. My worry is which bamboos to use. I love the yellow, like Phyllostychys aureocaulis (Golden Grove) but not sure if it is strong enough as it could be exposed to some wind. I bought from you a couple of years ago the Phyllostychys aureosulcata 'Spectabilis' which I planted in pots but it died this year. I see on your website some other bamboos but I don't like them as much as their canes seems less exposed and have a lot more foliage. But possibly these would be a better alternative... ...? For the ground cover I as thinking of Ophiopogen nigrescen. Do you think these plants will be suitable, or have you any other suggestions? Thank you for your help, Galia
    Asked on 2/15/2010 by e moran

    1 answer

  • Q:

    Hedging and Osmanthus plants

    Dear Crocus, I am looking for two Osmanthus burkwoodii plants but notice on your website that you only offer them for sale in 2 litre size. Do you have any larger Osmanthus burkwoodii plants? I am also looking for suggestions on which plants would make a good hedge. I am looking for something hardy, able to stand the frost, evergreen, not poisonous to horses and if possible, not just green possibly red / purple or variegated, any thoughts? Also, as these plants are grown in Surrey, will they be suitable to grow in the Scottish Borders? Many thanks, Jane
    Asked on 11/29/2009 by Janey Mitch

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Jane, I'm afraid we have all the plants we sell displayed on our website so we do not sell larger sizes of the Osmanthus. As for the hedging, if you click on the link below it will take you to our full range of hedging plants. Unfortunately we do not have anything that meets all your criteria, but if you click on the smaller images it will give you a lot more information on hardiness levels (fully hardy means they can cope with the weather in Scotland) as well as leaf colour etc. Unfortunately though I do not have a list of plants which are not poisonous to horses, but your local vet may be able to help you with this. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/hedging/plcid.30/ Best regards, Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 11/30/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Is a Yew hedge ok near a vegetable patch?

    Hello, I was wondering about planting a Yew hedge around my vegetable patch to hide some things behind the veg area. But is Yew too thirsty for this, and what kind of spacing would I need to allow before planting in front of it? Also with the berries being poisonous is there any danger to the food and people. Many thanks for your help. Samantha
    Asked on 11/4/2009 by Samantha Willis

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Samantha, Any well established hedge is going to take up a lot of water and nutrients from the soil, and as Yew can get really large it will eventually get pretty thuggish. The good news is though that it is slow growing so this will take many years. I would however be careful
      about planting it too close to the vegetable patch, not because I think the fruits will cause a problem with anything you may be growing (I have never heard of them causing a problem unless you eat them), but because it will cast a heavy shadow and most veg like a sunny spot. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 11/4/2009 by Samantha Willis
  • Q:

    Yellowing Yew tree

    Dear Crocus. I have a large Yew tree in my front garden. It has always been very healthy but recently I have noticed that a lot of the needles are turning yellow and falling off. I have looked online and seen that Yews like a fairly high pH. We live in an area of acid soil where Rhododendrons and Azaleas thrive. I would be surprised if the tree suddenly doesn't like our soil as it must be very old! Any help or advice will be gratefully received. Jackie
    Asked on 6/12/2009 by Jackie Edington

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Jackie, I'm afraid it is difficult to be sure why your Yew has suddenly turned yellow. If there are no signs of pests and diseases, then the most likely causes are either a watering issue (too much or too little), or Phytopthora Root Death, a much more sinister problem which is caused by a fungus that unfortunately there is no cure for. I'm sorry not to be more help. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 6/15/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    What is suitable for a cold, north-facing spot?

    We would like 2 evergreen plants to stand either side of our front door. The trouble is it is north facing and gets no sun at all and sometimes is subject to a cold north wind. Do you think a miniature bay tree would be any good? We would greatly appreciate your advice.
    Asked on 5/29/2006 by Ray

    1 answer

Displaying questions 1-6

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