Rosmarinus officinalis - 6 pack

rosemary promotion - Six pack

6 × 1lt pots (14cm)
pot size guide
£29.99 Buy
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1 year guarantee
All you can buy delivered for £4.99

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: May to June
  • Flower colour: purple blue
  • Other features: leaves may be used to flavour lamb, pork and roasted vegetables
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Upright spikes of aromatic, dark green leaves topped with purple blue flowers, from mid spring to early summer. This compact form of rosemary makes a fabulous, low, evergreen, flowering hedge for a sunny, well-drained site. It may be clipped into shape, retaining the young leaves for flavouring roasted vegetables, lamb and pork.

  • Garden care: To ensure a plentiful supply of young, succulent leaves for culinary use gather the leaves regularly and prune each spring.

Salvia officinalis 'Purpurascens'

purple sage

Attractive red-purple young leaves

£5.99 Buy

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
 
5.0

(based on 1 review)

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Reviewed by 1 customer

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(2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

I would buy this product again

By Girasol

from London

Pros

  • Accurate Instructions

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Patio

    I ordered Rosemary plants to cook with, the plants came in perfect condition exactly as pictured, good mature plants and look great in pots at my front garden. Very easy too look after them too.

    • Your Gardening Experience:
    • Keen but clueless

    Comment on this review

     

    Do you want to ask a question about this?

    If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
    5 Questions | 6 Answers
    Displaying questions 1-5
    • Q:

      Pruning an old Rosemary Bush

      Good afternoon, I have a very old (20 years +) large rosemary bush, used all the time for cooking purposes! However, this summer it became 'dead' / 'ill' in the centre of the plant. I have since cut out ALL the dead wood to allow more light into the bush, which it seems to have liked. However, I was wondering whether I should be pruning some of the woody stems or do you think this would kil it? Hoping you can advise. Many thanks.
      Asked on 11/3/2009 by Veronica

      2 answers

      • A:

        Thank you. So a mid-Spring prune, it is. Actually, I'm not sentimental about it, I just use it a lot in cooking. Very many thanks

        Answered on 11/4/2009 by Veronica
      • A:

        Hello There, Really old rosemary plants are best replaced, but if you have a sentimental attachment to it, and the plant looks quite vigorous, you can try to rejuvenate it by cutting back all the remaining shoots to about half their length in mid spring. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

        Answered on 11/4/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • Q:

      Plants suitable for patio pots

      Hello I wanted to enquire if you have a Sarocococca hookeriana var. humilis, I looked online but it's not listed. I am askng for that particular plant, because I only have a patio and want plants that won't grow to an enormous size or require spectacular care. A rosemary and a dwarf syringa I bought from you are doing very well. Plants always arrive in very good condition which I really appreciate. A Myrtus communis subsp. 'Tarentina' which I potted up immediately in a larger pot suffered shock I think, - I wonder what you know about this myrtle? I am wanting to grow plants on a small patio in containers and wonder if the following plants are suitable:- Sarcococca hookeriana var. humilis (if you have got it) or a Sarcococca hookeriana digyna (which is in your listings). Winter Jasmine, or any of the other Jasmines, Wintersweet, Witchhazel, Abelia grandiflora but would this be too large for my patio- I am thinking of winter cheer with its red berries, and Nandina Domestica. Many thanks Bernadette
      Asked on 7/26/2009 by Bernadette Matthews

      1 answer

      • A:

        Hello Bernadette, I'm afraid we do not sell Sacrocococca hookeriana var. humilis, but the other two we list will be fine in a large pot as long as they are kept well fed and watered. It is my experience that most plants will cope if the pot is big enough and they are well looked after, however larger plants like the Jasminum nudiflorum, Wintersweet, Witchhazel, Abelia or Nandinas will eventually run out of steam and need to be placed into the garden. You should however be able to get a good few years from them. As for the Myrtus, I have not heard that they particularly dislike being moved, but as they are not fully hardy they need protection in winter. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

        Answered on 7/27/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • Q:

      Which plants are Deer proof?

      I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.
      Asked on 2/3/2006 by david

      1 answer

      • A:

        Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

        Answered on 2/6/2006 by Crocus
    • Q:

      What can grow in a pot in a seaside location?

      We have a decent-sized front garden and we would love to have something that we can grow in a very large tub. We live very close to the beach so it is sometimes very windy. What can we put out there?
      Asked on 5/16/2005 by Pat Fox

      1 answer

      • A:

        There are some great plants that should be able to cope provided they are kept well fed and watered. Here are some of the best. Ceanothus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.ceanothus/?s=ceanothus Cistus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.cistus/?s=cistus Lavandula http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/mediterranean-plants/lavandula-angustifolia-elizabeth/classid.2000008323/ Convolvulus cneorum http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/mediterranean-plants/convolvulus-cneorum-/classid.940/ Rosmarinus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.rosmarinus/?s=rosmarinus Brachyglottis (Dunedin Group) 'Sunshine' http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/mediterranean-plants/brachyglottis-dunedin-group-sunshine/classid.4376/

        Answered on 5/13/2005 by Corcus
    • Q:

      What can I plant that the deers won't eat?

      What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.
      Asked on 3/18/2005 by Kelly L. Sliker

      1 answer

      • A:

        Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

        Answered on 3/21/2005 by Crocus
    Displaying questions 1-5

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