Rosa filipes 'Kiftsgate'

rose filipes Kiftsgate (rambler)

4 litre pot £17.99 £14.99 Buy
+
-
1 year guarantee

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: July to August
  • Flower colour: creamy-white
  • Other features: scented flowers
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Large sprays of single, scented, creamy-white flowers from July to August, followed by bright, red hips, and glossy, light green leaves. This extremely vigorous climbing rose is perfect for covering an unsightly building or growing through a strong tree. Tall and spreading, it requires fertile, moist, well-drained soil and adequate space to grow.

    All our roses are grown in an open field and then dug up when the weather conditions are right in October or November. Some suppliers send out their roses as 'bare root' plants (ie without pots or compost), but we pot ours up as it helps to keep the roots hydrated and in good condition. As they are dormant throughout the winter, they will not produce any new roots until spring, so don't be surprised if the compost falls away from the roots when you take them out of their pots. The roses can be kept in their pots throughout the winter provided they are kept well fed and watered, however ideally they should planted out as soon as possible. They will already have been cut back so no further pruning will be required, apart from snipping off any tips that have died back. Routine pruning can begin in late winter the year after planting.

  • Garden care: If planting in winter, choose a frost-free spell when the soil is not frozen. Roses are quite deep-rooted plants so dig a deep hole roughly twice as wide as the plants roots and mix in a generous amount of composted organic matter. A top-dressing of a general purpose fertiliser can be worked into the surrounding soil and we also recommend using Rose Rootgrow at this stage to encourage better root development. This is particularly important when planting into a bed where roses have previously been grown as Rose Rootgrow is said to combat rose sickness (aka. replant disease). Before planting you will also need to make sure that there is adequate support for the rose to grow onto.

    Remove the plants from their pots and gently spread out the roots before placing them in the centre of the hole. Try to ensure that the 'bud union' (the point where the cultivated rose has been grafted onto the rootstock, and from where the shoots emerge) is at soil level. You can judge this quite easily by laying something flat, like a spade handle or bamboo cane, across the top of the hole. When they are at the right height, back-fill the hole, firming the soil down gently before watering the plant well. Tie the stems to the support in and open fan shape and as new shhots emerge, tie these in horizontally.

    Water generously until well established, and apply a specialist rose fertiliser (following the manufacturers instructions) each spring. They will also benefit from a generous mulch of composted farmyard manure in spring, but make sure this is kept away from the stems.

    When your rose has filled the allotted space, one in three of the oldest stems can be cut right back to their base. In smaller areas, remove all the stems that have flowered, tie in new stems to replace them, and then shorten the side-shoots of the remaining stems by up to two thirds. This should be done in late summer after their flowers and hips have faded. Rambling roses usually respond well to hard pruning, so those that have become overgrown can be renovated from late autumn to late winter. First remove any dead, damaged or weak-looking stems completely. Keeping from four to six young stems, cut all the others right back to their base. Shorten the side shoots on the remaining stems by up to a half and tie these onto the support.

There are currently no 'goes well with' suggestions for this item.

 

Do you want to ask a question about this?

If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
3 Questions | 3 Answers
Displaying questions 1-3
  • Q:

    Hi,
    Would this rose (Rosa filipes 'Kiftsgate') do ok in a pot? I don't know much about roses, but I would like it to cover a bit of wall, however the ground is cemented over (sounds lovely doesn't it!). The wall can get very hot in the afternoon(its west facing and gets full sun). Would this plant be suitable and if not do you have any other suggestions for something vigorous, with lots of flowers and scented.
    Many thanks.
    Asked on 4/13/2014 by Rosie-Primrose from London

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello there
      This is a beautiful rose but it is a vigorous climber so not the ideal rose for a container. You can grow roses in containers but they need large deep pots, and I would use varieties that are more compact and not vigorous. However, I don't think a rose is the right plant for this area as if it gets really hot, the plant pot will dry out very fast, and then the rose will become prone to powdery mildew .
      There are 2 possible climbers that you could use for a hot area that are scented, but they will need a large container, and will need to be kept watered and fed during the growing season to grow well. I have attached links below to the climbers, but they are classed as only frost hardy which means they may need protection during the winter.
      Trachelospermum jasminoides
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/trachelospermum-jasminoides/classid.1728/
      Trachelospermum jasminoides 'Star of Toscana'
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/trachelospermum-jasminoides-star-of-toscana/classid.2000022510/
      Hope this helps

      Answered on 4/14/2014 by Anonymous from crocus
  • Q:

    I have a very vigorous white scented rose with single flowers. I think it is Kiftsgate, but a) the flowers look fuller and more bunched than your photo b) it flowers in June-July rather than July-August c) it doesn't produce any hips (alas) although it crawls with bees. The leaves have anything from 5 - 7 leaflets and it flowers once in a great burst. Huge flexible growths each season.
    I could send a picture, but how?
    Any idea what else it might be, or how can I get hips on it?
    Asked on 7/29/2013 by Horse from Newbury

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      I'm afraid there are many thousands of different roses, so it will be almost impossible to put a name to the one you have. As for the hips, not all roses will produce showy ones, and if you have one that doesn't, there is little you can do about it.

      I'm really sorry not to be more help,

      Answered on 7/30/2013 by Helen from Crocus
  • Q:

    I bought a Rosa filipes 'Kiftsgate' from you earlier this year and, whilst it is growing really well, it doesn't appear to be creating any buds. I don't know much about roses, so apologies if there is an obvious reason for this.
    Asked on 7/3/2013 by CJ from Warwick

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      There are a number of reasons why plants don't flower including too much shade or not enough water or nutrients. It can also be caused by the plant putting on new root growth instead of focusing its energies on producing flowers. I am not really sure why yours has not produced buds yet, but given time and the right conditions, there is no reason why it wont flower. You can often give them a bit of a push by feeding during the growing season with a high potash fertiliser.

      Answered on 7/4/2013 by Helen from Crocus
Displaying questions 1-3

Do you have a question about this product? 

Large Flowered Clematis

Large  Flowered Clematis

It is difficult not to get excited about this fabulous group of plants. Their big, bold, brightly coloured flowers, coupled with their versatile growth habits, make this one of the most popular plant groups of all time. There is no secret to their success

Read full article

How to get more flowers

How to get more flowers

Many flowering plants can be encouraged to produce better and longer-lasting displays with the minimum of effort. A plant produces flowers in order to reproduce and ensure the survival of the species. Once a plant has flowered and fertilisation has taken

Read full article

How to create a wildlife-friendly garden

Wildlife-friendly gardens are not only more interesting as you can watch all the comings and goings, but they are often more productive as many creatures will help increase pollination. Garden ponds act as a magnet to dragonflies and damsel flies, along w

Read full article

July pruning of trees, shrubs and climbers

Early-summer- flowering shrubs can be pruned this month to keep them vigorous and flowering well. It is also the ideal time to prune several trees that are prone to bleeding if pruned at other times, and it’s not too late to complete the pruning jobs for

Read full article

Cottage garden

The traditional cottage garden was an intensive, yet carefree mixture of fruit, vegetables, herbs and flowers all crowded into a tiny space. Today, this informal charm can be recreated using modern varieties that largely take care of themselves around an

Read full article

Pruning roses

Early spring is a good time to start pruning roses The exact time will depend on where in the country you are and how cold it is. Pruning time is between mid-March through to early April, watch for when the buds start to swell, but before any leaves appe

Read full article

November Musing

The rose has been the nation’s favourite flower for centuries, prized for their fragrant blooms that make June the dreamiest month of the year. However late-autumn and winter, when these sleeping beauties are having their long rest, is the best time to

Read full article