Rhus typhina

stag's horn sumach

2 litre pot
pot size guide
£16.99 £11.99 Email me when in stock
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  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: moist but well-drained, moderately-fertile soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: June to August
  • Flower colour: conical clusters of yellow-green flowers
  • Other features: on female plants the flowers are followed by deep crimson-red fruit
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    An upright, deciduous shrub or small tree with finely-cut dark green leaflets turning spectacular shades of orange-red in autumn. Stag's horn sumach is an excellent specimen plant for a small sunny garden. Since it spreads by suckering avoid planting too close to a lawn or surround the roots with a non-perishable barrier that will restrict the plant's spread.

  • Garden care: Wearing stout gardening gloves remove any suckering shoots that arise around the base of the plant.

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8 Questions | 8 Answers
Displaying questions 1-8
  • Q:

    My beautiful Staghorn has failed to produce leaves this spring. no sign of life with all the small branches brittle and dead. This is a mature tree 20+ years old. what happened? no outer sign of disease.
    Asked on 5/30/2014 by Chick from Northern Ireland

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      I'm afraid I cannot say for sure from your description. If there were no signs of pests or diseases, then the most likely problem will be cultural, so although they are usually pretty resilient, it may have suffered from excessive wet in all the rain we had in winter,

      Answered on 6/2/2014 by helen from crocus
  • Q:

    How big are the sumac trees you sell, and how quickly will they grow? I've been looking for one for a long time - none of the garden centres within about 20 miles sell them.
    Asked on 4/6/2014 by graemerr from United Kingdom

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello there
      The Rhus typhina in a 2lt pot will be approx 30-40cm. Hope this helps.

      Answered on 4/7/2014 by Anonymous from crocus
  • Q:

    Rhus typhina -(Stag's Horn sumach tree)

    Hi, I want to buy a Stag's Horn sumach tree to grow in a container as I have a small garden. Can I plant it now or is it better to wait until Spring?. Thanks Karen
    Asked on 12/17/2009 by Karen Barker

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Karen, These plants are fully hardy so they can be planted out at any time of the year. It might be worth keeping in mind though that they are deciduous so completely bare in the winter months.. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 12/18/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    When do I prune my Stag's horn?

    Hi, I've got a Stag's horn tree planted in a barrel, it has been there for a number of years. This year the new growth is encroaching on the conifer next to it, is it possible to prune the Stag's horn and if so when is the best time? Many thanks Suzanne
    Asked on 7/1/2009 by peculiar.pals

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Suzanne, These plants tolerate hard pruning, so it can certainly be cut back. The best time to do this is in spring.

      Answered on 7/8/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    My Stag's horn - Rhus is sending up shoots

    Dear Crocus We have a big problem with my Stag's horn - Rhus. We had to have it cut down earlier this year as we had to have a fence replaced and it was growing too near. We had several new growths coming so it was not a total loss. The problem now is that we have a very small garden (I just read your plant details and you say not to plant in a small space or near a lawn - but I did not know that when I planted a cutting from my late parents garden!) and new growths are coming up all over the lawn - about 2-3 metres from the original shrub. How do I stop this? They are appearing at an alarming rate. I don't want to kill the whole thing as I really like the autumn display and the plant reminds me of my childhood home. I look forward to getting your advice Sarah
    Asked on 6/27/2009 by J HIGHFIELD

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Sarah, Luckily these plants tolerate being pruned hard each year in early spring, so your best option is to do just that and cut back any unwanted suckers to ground level as soon as they appear. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 7/4/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Is my Stag Horn OK?

    Help, I have a Stag Horn tree in my garden , it is quite a mature specimen about 20-25 feet and has been planted for nearly 6 years. It has 5 main stems from the ground , one of which the leaves have completely wilted and turned brown. I had considered removing this one stem but I now notice other branches from the other stems are also going. Can you advise if this sounds like a normal event for such a tree and will it rejuvenate next year. Any advice would be welcome. Iain
    Asked on 6/24/2009 by Anonymous

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Iain, Sadly these plants are prone to Verticillium Wilt, the symptoms of which do match your description. The leaves may show yellowing or browning, and it can affect one branch at a time. You can usually spot it if you remove the bark on the affected stem, and the tissue beneath is often stained brown or has purplish streaks. This is more apparent close to the base. I'm afraid it is not good news though as there is no cure (it is caused by a fungus, which can be found in the soil or in leaf litter), so you should remove the tree as soon as possible as well as the soil in the surrounding area. Make sure you clean any tools you use to help prevent it spreading. Once it has been cleared you can re-plant, but avoid all of the following as they too are susceptible - Acer, Berberis, Catalpa, Cercis, Chaenomeles, Cotinus, Daphne, Malus, Prunus, Pyrus, Rhus and Tillia. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 6/26/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Which plants are Deer proof?

    I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.
    Asked on 2/3/2006 by david

    1 answer

    • A:

      Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

      Answered on 2/6/2006 by Crocus
  • Q:

    What can I plant that the deers won't eat?

    What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.
    Asked on 3/18/2005 by Kelly L. Sliker

    1 answer

    • A:

      Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

      Answered on 3/21/2005 by Crocus
Displaying questions 1-8

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Deer

Deer eat a wide range of plants and usually visit the garden between dusk and dawn. Sometimes the deer have a particular taste for flowers and will eat tulip blooms, but usually it is whole shoots that are lost. Tree trunks and branches may also be damage

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March pruning of trees, shrubs and climbers

The following notes can be used as a guide when pruning trees, shrubs and climbers in your garden during the month of March. It's timely advice if you have any of the following in your garden. Abeliophyllum, Artemesia, Brachyglottis, Brunfelsia, Buddleja

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