Pyracantha Saphyr Jaune ('Cadaune') (PBR)

firethorn (syn. Saphyr Yellow)

2 litre pot
pot size guide
£12.99 Buy
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  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: any fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: May
  • Flower colour: pure white
  • Other features: bright yellow berries
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    To find out more about how to plant a hedge, click here

    Upright, later spreading, evergreen shrub with dark green leaves, spiny branches and bunches of small white flowers in late spring. These are followed by a profusion of bright yellow berries in autumn. It is for these showy berries that it is grown, providing colour in the garden when there is little else. It can be grown as a free-standing shrub, against a wall or as a hedge.

  • Garden care: When planting incorporate plenty of well-rotted organic matter in to the planting hole. Prune hedges in early to mid-summer. In early spring, trim out misplaced or crossing branches on free-standing shrubs. Tie in any shoots to extend the framework of wall shrubs, and shorten branches to about 2 or 3 leaves from the base after flowering to expose the berries.

Helleborus niger

Christmas rose

Bowl-shaped, white flowers in the depths of winter

£8.99 Buy

Cornus alba 'Sibirica'

red-barked dogwood

Bright coral-red stems in winter

£8.99 Buy

Helleborus niger Harvington hybrids double-flowered

Christmas rose hellebore

A rare and highly sought-after variety

£18.99 Buy

Jasminum nudiflorum

winter jasmine

Cheerful yellow flowers in winter

£12.99 Buy

Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple'

smoke bush

Magnificent smoke-like plumes

£12.99 Buy
 

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20 Questions | 24 Answers
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
  • Q:

    Pyracantha not flowering?

    Hello I have a 'Firethorn' Pyracantha which has been in the ground for many years, but mine seems to be the only one which has hardly any flowers or berries. Have you any idea why this should be and how I can get it to produce more? I do trim back from time to time to keep it close to the fence. When should pruning be carried out? Thank you for your help. Elaine
    Asked on 4/11/2010 by Elaine Brownsell

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Elaine, There are a number of reasons why plants don't flower including too much shade, not enough water or nutrients, or pruning at the wrong time of the year (this should be tackled in mid spring). It can also be caused by the plant putting on new root growth instead of focusing its energies on producing flowers. I am not really sure why yours has not produced buds, but you can often give them a bit of a push by feeding with a high potash fertiliser. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 4/12/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Hedging ideas

    Hello and hope you can help,- I'm a novice and a hopeless gardener hoping to learn quickly. Do you have any suggestions for mixed hedging for an approx 60 feet boundary? No preference or favourites, though a bit of colour would be appreciated at some time in the seasons but it needs to grow to at least five feet preferably six feet high and act as a barrier to human. I would like it to attract wildlife, particularly the birds and provide some year round interest with colour (hopefully). Lawrence
    Asked on 3/14/2010 by lawrence dixon

    1 answer

  • Q:

    Advice on climbers please

    Hi, I need to find climbing plants for the length of a 2m high wood panel fence with concrete posts. I haven't measured the entire length but I would estimate around 15m. It is South facing and on a side of the garden that gets a lot of sun in the summer, the soil is clay and tends to dry out. I have no idea how many plants I would need to cover the entire fence (I am notoriously bad at judging the spread of a plant and always end up with an overcrowding problem). I am looking for something to deter anyone from climbing over the fence, yet ideally something that won't be treacherous to deal with myself (if such a plant exists!). Climbing roses are the first to spring to mind and if I were to go down that route I would definitely opt for white or cream flowers. I have had a look at the white climbing roses on your site but am unsure whether they will be happy in our soil, as you specify 'moist, well-drained' humus rich soil. I would also like to get an evergreen climber for the rear fence (+/- 5m long). I am not concerned whether this flowers or not, and I am less concerned about this being a 'thief-deterrent'. The soil is the same,- lots of clay, which plants seem to like, but it is very hard to work with and dries out easily in the summer. Any advice gratefully accepted! Best regards, Heather
    Asked on 3/12/2010 by Thuli

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Heather, Unfortunately there are no plants that will deter intruders without being difficult to deal with, and the best plants are those with thorns like the roses. It sounds like roses will certainly grow in your soil, but ideally you should dig in lots of composted organic matter and then make sure they are kept well watered in summer. It can be difficult to see a small plant and imagine how big it will grow to eventually, however we do give all this information on each plant card, which hopefully should help. You will find it just to the right of the pictures at the top of the pages. If you click on the following rose, you will see it has an eventual height and spread of 10 x 6 m http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/roses/climber-rose/rambling-roses/climbers/rosa-filipes-kiftsgate/classid.1280/ while this one will only grow to 3 x 2m http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/roses/climber-rose/climbers/climbing-roses/rosa-climbing-iceberg/classid.1181/ I would pick the one you like the look of and then you will be able to establish how many you need to fill your fence. As for the evergreens, if you click on the following link it will take you to our full range of evergreen or semi-evergreen climbers that will grow in clay soils, but the same rules apply re preparing the soil and watering. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/plcid.15/vid.9/vid.228/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 3/12/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Imformal Hedge needed

    Good Morning, Could you please help me? I have just erected a 4ft fence around the front of my property, and I would like to plant an informal hedge. The problem is that I need one that will be sturdy and strong enough to combat footballs as I live around a green. I would like to plant something that is very hardy, extremely quick growing with thorny, spiky stems, which I can cut with a hedge trimmer to shape. I thought either one of the Pyracanthas or the Berberis darwinii. Out of the 2 which one would you recommend me to order, as I would like to plant the hedge as soon as can. Thank you, Nadine
    Asked on 2/25/2010 by Nadine Bolton

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Nadine, Both of them would be suitable, but I think the Berberis will be slightly faster growing so may be your best option. I hope this helps, Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 2/25/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Hardy climbers for a big pot?

    Hello the folks at Crocu. I'd really appreciate some advice from you regarding hardy climbers. I'm looking to plant a hardy climber (or two) in a very large patio pot in my smallish front garden. I have an iron obelisk which I want to use to give height in the pot. The site is North East facing (it gets sunshine in the mornings). I am looking for a fairly fast-growing, fully hardy or borderline hardy plant(s) which have some all year round interest, either leaf colour, berries and/or flowers. I've been looking at the hardy climbers selection on the Crocus website but I am not sure which plants would be suitable. Roses were my initial idea but they obviously don't give all year colour, or foliage, and the plant/obelisk/pot combination is intended to be something of a permanent feature in the garden. Any advice and suggestions you have will be most welcome! Many thanks. Best wishes, Stephanie
    Asked on 1/6/2010 by Steph Richards

    2 answers

    • A:

      Hi Helen, Many thanks for your speedy response. I see - yes, the plant options are somewhat limited aren't they? Your suggestions are very useful though - I know that a variegated Hedera grows well over my next door neighbour's front fence, and I have recently planted a Pyracantha against the house walls in my newly redesigned front garden, so a stand alone plant(s) might be a nice planting compliment within the same space. Thanks for these ideas! Best wishes, Stephanie

      Answered on 1/6/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • A:

      Hello Stephanie, There are very few evergreen climbers which don't end up looking tatty during the winter, so your best option is either one of the Hederas as they don't change much at all and will cope happily with the aspect. You can also train and clip them to shape quite easily - just click on the following link to take you straight to it. http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.hedera/
      Alternatively, if your pots and obelisks are really large, a better option may be an evergreen shrub that can be trained to fit like Pyracantha. http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.pyracantha/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 1/6/2010 by Steph Richards
  • Q:

    Clay loving evergreen plant for covering a wall

    Sir, I need to hide an ugly brick wall. I would prefer to have all year cover, meaning evergreen, and not over 6` or so tall, and able to thrive in my clay rich soil. I thought of a blue lilac but am not sure if the roots could cope. A variety of plants might look nice and would breakup the monotony of the wall, but your advice would be much appreciated. Sincerely, Dorothy.
    Asked on 12/17/2009 by dorothy

    1 answer

  • Q:

    Climber for South facing wall

    Dear Sir/ Madam, I wanted to order a couple of climbers for a south facing wall. I already have a Virginia Creeper growing but the wall is concrete and looks terrible in the in winter. Have you got any recommendations for an evergreen climber that would grow well on a south facing wall, and also grow with a Virginia Creeper? Kind regards, Roland
    Asked on 12/10/2009 by s8films

    1 answer

  • Q:

    Plant to cover a fence

    Please can you suggest a shrub/tree that could be grown as an espalier on a new 2 metre close boarded fence, facing East by North-it gets a good few hours of sun in the morning. I need to cover about 10 to 12 feet in width, and the plant would need to be planted close to one end of the fence. (The fence borders a paved area leading into a border.) I would hope to start with something already fairly well grown if possible. Many thanks
    Asked on 12/6/2009 by Rita Ireland

    2 answers

    • A:

      Dear Helen, Thank you for the reply. I had been thinking about Pyracantha so you have confirmed that this would be suitable.

      Answered on 12/8/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • A:

      Hello There, The best options would be one of the following
      Chaenomeles http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.chaenomeles/
      Pyracantha http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.pyracantha/
      or Garrya http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/garrya-elliptica-james-roof/classid.3880 Unfortunately though we only sell the sizes listed on our site and none of them will have been trained into an espalier. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 12/8/2009 by Rita Ireland
  • Q:

    Hedging and Osmanthus plants

    Dear Crocus, I am looking for two Osmanthus burkwoodii plants but notice on your website that you only offer them for sale in 2 litre size. Do you have any larger Osmanthus burkwoodii plants? I am also looking for suggestions on which plants would make a good hedge. I am looking for something hardy, able to stand the frost, evergreen, not poisonous to horses and if possible, not just green possibly red / purple or variegated, any thoughts? Also, as these plants are grown in Surrey, will they be suitable to grow in the Scottish Borders? Many thanks, Jane
    Asked on 11/29/2009 by Janey Mitch

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Jane, I'm afraid we have all the plants we sell displayed on our website so we do not sell larger sizes of the Osmanthus. As for the hedging, if you click on the link below it will take you to our full range of hedging plants. Unfortunately we do not have anything that meets all your criteria, but if you click on the smaller images it will give you a lot more information on hardiness levels (fully hardy means they can cope with the weather in Scotland) as well as leaf colour etc. Unfortunately though I do not have a list of plants which are not poisonous to horses, but your local vet may be able to help you with this. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/hedging/plcid.30/ Best regards, Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 11/30/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Prickly hedge required

    Dear Crocus, I am looking to grow a hedge in my garden. The purpose is that it looks good and stops intruders climbing over a wall so I would like nice prickly plants. I have looked at the 'Firethorns' - Pyracanthas, but are there any others that you sell that you would recommend? The location is on top of a wall and against a fence. I will either use troughs, railway sleeper or something similar to create a bed which I will then have to feed the plants myself. Are these plants suitable? Thank you for your assistance. Andrew
    Asked on 10/27/2009 by Andrew Baldwin

    3 answers

    • A:

      Hi Helen, Many thanks for your reply. What is the minimum soil depth, is
      30-60 cm going to be workable if the hedge only needs to be approx 90cm
      tall? Thank you

      Answered on 10/27/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • A:

      Hello Andrew, there are no hard and fast rules, but hedges are densely planted so there is a lot of competition for water, light and nutrients. Therefore I can only say the bigger the planter the better, and the smaller the root area, the higher the maintenance will be and the harder it will be to keep them alive. I'm sorry not to be more help. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 10/28/2009 by Andrew Baldwin
    • A:

      Hello Andrew, I am worried about the area you want to plant in which sounds very small. For the plants to grow to create a healthy hedge they will need space and soil depth. Pyracantha is good for hedging, but you may also like to look at Rosa rugosa or Berberis. Hope this helps Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 10/28/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
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