Prunus 'Amanogawa'

Japanese flowering cherry

10lt pot (0.8-1m)
pot size guide
£34.99 Buy
+
-
bare root (1 - 1.2m)
pot size guide
£29.99 Email me when in stock

Where space is tight, grow this fastigiate, or columnar flowering cherry - a skyrocket covered in upright small flowers of shell-pink

Val Bourne - Garden Writer

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  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: tolerates most soils
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: April
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    A compact, often multi-stemmed tree, which has clusters of large, fragrant, semi-double pale pink blossoms that smother the branches in late spring. This upright, columnar Japanese cherry is one of the best ornamental trees for a small garden. It will thrive in any soil but does need plenty of sunshine to flower well.

  • Garden care: When planting incorporate lots of well-rotted garden compost in the planting hole and stake firmly. Lightly prune in summer to retain the shape and cut back any dead, diseased or branches which cross to healthy wood.

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9 Questions | 9 Answers
Displaying questions 1-9
  • Q:

    Hi! Really interested in this tree - Is it ok to plant near a fence? And if so, how we can ensure it grows more like a column rather than spreading out over next door's garden?! is this possible? Thanks.
    Asked on 7/1/2014 by newtothis! from Birmingham

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      This tree has a naturally columnar habit, so it has a maximum spread of just 4 metres. As for planting close to a fence, I would leave a gap of around 1m if possible.

      Answered on 7/4/2014 by helen from crocus
  • Q:

    When it states bare root, does this mean it has no height.? I want to order the tallest possible option.
    Thanks
    Asked on 6/25/2014 by sallyd from manchester

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      Bare root means that the plant does not come in a pot filled with soil so effectively the roots are bare. Bare root plants are only ever sold during the colder months of the year when they are completely dormant.

      Answered on 6/27/2014 by helen from crocus
  • Q:

    i have an amanagowa tree ready to plant. it is about 4ft tall and am not ready yet to put it in permanent spot - is it ok to pot this up in a large container for say 6 months. thanks,
    Asked on 6/1/2014 by alice from west sussex

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      Yes this will be quite happy in a large container filled with John Innes No2. compost. provided it is kept well watered.

      Answered on 6/2/2014 by helen from crocus
  • Q:

    hello, i really like this tree, but i only have a balcony that i want to decorate and therefore the plants i need, would need to stay in pots (i have 2 biggish pots ready to fill), can this one by any chance be left in a pot? or maybe a smaller version of this plant. Or do you have any suggestions of plants I can buy, and leave out on the balcony during winter as there is not much room in my flat. i also do not get too much sun on the balcony,

    Thanks in advance for your answers
    Asked on 4/27/2014 by travisb from london

    1 answer

  • Q:

    Hello
    I would love to have a Prunus Amanogawa but would need to restrict the height to 10 - 12 feet. Do you think I could grow it in the ground in a large container OR could I just top it at 12 feet? Would that alter the shape adversely? Or look dreadful??
    Cheers
    Asked on 2/18/2013 by ocrumbs from London

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      If you grow this plant in a large pot, then it will help restrict its height, but ultimately it will be happier in the ground. I would not advise cutting it back too hard as this makes it vulnerable to diseases and will eventually weaken it.

      Answered on 2/20/2013 by Helen from Crocus
  • Q:

    Help with plants for N/East facing garden

    Hi, I have a little problem choosing some plants....... I really like the look and size of the 'Shady Pink' pre-designed corner planting plan, but our problem is that we have a north east facing garden, so we get no sun at all in the winter, and direct sun for only half a day on either side of the garden during the summer. Would this planting plan be suitable for that level of shade? We are actually are buying plants for the entire garden, so we'd need about 6 new shrubs, and maybe a small tree (we were thinking about the Prunus Amanogawa). Could you please help us with a few shrubs that would do well in these conditions? For perennials, we have been recommended; - Geranium Johnson's Blue, Kniphofia, Crocosmia, and Helleborus foetidus. Are these suitable? Many many thanks! Regards, Josee
    Asked on 4/12/2010 by Josee Mallet

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Josee, It is always difficult to give a definitive answer to the shade issue, but looking at the Shady Pink border, the most shade tolerant plants include Anemone hupehensis Hadspen Abundance, Thalictrum aquilegiifolium and Dryopteris erythrosora. If you click on the following link it will take you to all our shade-loving shrubs http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/plcid.1/vid.11/ and for the shade -loving perennials http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/plcid.2/vid.11/ Of the plants you have listed, the Prunus, Helleborus foetidus, Kniphofia and Crocosmia will be OK as long as there is more sun than shade. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 4/13/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Am I ok planting in winter?

    Hello, Sorry to trouble you, but being new to gardening I was hoping you would be kind enough to help me....... Can you please let me know if it's OK for me to plant these plants listed below now, or should I wait? I've read a number of different opinions and hence confused. I'd hate to plant them and they end up dying! Many thanks Richard Phyllostachys nigra Prunus 'Amanogawa' Sorbus vilmorinii Prunus ?? subhirtella 'Autumnalis'
    Asked on 1/1/2010 by Richard Hollidge

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Richard, All the plants are fully hardy so can be planted out at any time as long as the ground isn't frozen. Therefore I would leave them in their pots until the ground is not frozen solid and then get them in the ground. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 1/5/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    How do I plant my Cherry blossom tree?

    Hi, What is the depth of hole I should dig for the Cherry tree 10L pot please? What type of compost should I use? Should I plant the pot the plant comes in as well or remove it before planting? How often should I be watering this tree if I plant it within the next two weeks? i.e. Ever other day for two weeks, etc. Regards, Scott
    Asked on 6/30/2009 by Scott Gilmour

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Scott, You should dig a hole twice as wide and deep as the existing rootball of the plant. You should then dig in lots of composted organic matter (or John Innes No 3 compost) and backfill until the plant will sit (without its pot) at the same soil level as it had in the pot. You can then gently backfill the sides around the rootball and firm it down without compacting it. As for watering, this will depend on a number of factors, but to be sure all you need to do is keep an eye on it and water it when the surrounding soil feels dry. We do have an article on how to plant on our site which you may find useful - just click on the following link to go straight to it. http://www.crocus.co.uk/features/_/artcat.114/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 7/4/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    What can I use as a centrepiece in my bed?

    I'm looking for a small ornamental tree or shrub for a centrepiece, ideally with with flowers or pretty foliage. Can you give me any ideas??
    Asked on 5/2/2005 by David Poulter

    1 answer

Displaying questions 1-9

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