Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. spectabilis

showy yellow-groove bamboo

5 litre pot 80-100cm
pot size guide
£39.99 £29.99 Buy
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Spend £60 and save £10

Probably the best colour-caned bamboo with custard-yellow hulms bar coded in deep green and this bamboo can produce zigzag stems as well

Val Bourne - Garden Writer

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All you can buy delivered for £4.99

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Leaves: narrow, mid-green
  • Canes: green-grooved, golden-yellow turning bright red in sunlight
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Tall bamboo with green-grooved, golden-yellow canes, which can flash with shades of red in the sun, fading to darker yellow with age. This colourful variety looks great alongside the ebony-black canes of the black bamboo, Phyllostachys nigra. This aptly named coloured-stemmed bamboo is one of our 'highly recommended plants'.

  • Garden care: Plant in a large container or surround the roots with a non-perishable barrier that restricts the plant's spread.

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Phyllostachys nigra

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17 Questions | 24 Answers
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
  • Q:

    Hello there-we have just bought three phyllostachys-aureosulcata-spectabilis on your website. I am a little confused as to contradicting opinion of eventual height of this plant/bamboo. We read the spec that is alongside the option to buy on the right hand side and it says 6m tall which is what we need to block off the neighbours overlooking view but some of the comments in reply to questions on this forum say they grow to 3m tall- can you tell me which is correct?

    Thank you.
    Asked on 6/28/2014 by kate from Maidstone

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      It is very difficult to be too specific about plant heights as so much depends upon their growing conditions. These plants can have an eventual height of anywhere between 3 and 6 metres, so we have given the maximum possible height.

      Answered on 6/30/2014 by helen from crocus
  • Q:

    How many stems in a 5ltr pot? How quickly would these spread? I am trying to cover a distance along a fence of approx 5.5m so need to understand how many pots to buy. Also, how deep rooting are they?
    Asked on 5/9/2014 by Freeby65 from Camberley, Surrey

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      It is difficult to say how many stems each pot will have as they will all vary. As a very general guide, I would say they will have between one thicker one or three thinner ones and they will be up to 1m tall. As for their roots, they can get about 1m deep and can spread to over 6m. As this is a spreading form it is not ideal for hedging, but if you can control the spread of the roots with a barrier system such as this one...

      http://www.crocus.co.uk/product/_/bamboo-control-system/classid.2000019273/


      ...then I would advise planting them at 50cm intervals.

      Answered on 5/16/2014 by helen from crocus
  • Q:

    Hi

    Please could you give me some more ideas of companion plants for this bamboo?

    I'd like to plants to be no higher than 60cm tall, with a mix of perennial and some evergreen plants. Also the size of the plot is only 1.5 meters wide.
    Asked on 2/13/2013 by Treasure from Benson,Oxfordshire

    1 answer

  • Q:

    Can I grow a Bamboo in a pot?

    Dear Sir Please can you tell me if I can grow a bamboo in a 2ft deep window type box for a patio? Thanks Roger
    Asked on 4/15/2010 by roger pannell

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Roger, As long as you make sure you keep it really well fed and watered, it should be fine as long as it is nice and wide. After a couple of years though it will need to be planted in the ground - as will most things that grow to a good size. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 4/16/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Can I plant my Bamboo in the ground in a pot with drainage holes?

    I have a couple of largish bamboos that I wish to plant in a pot in the ground. However, the plastic pots have drainage holes in the bottom. I know that bamboo can become extremely invasive (which is why I wish to plant them in pots). Will the roots go through the holes in the bottom? Or should I use pots without drainage holes? If so, will the bamboo survive with no drainage? Or is there a special type of pot for this purpose? Many thanks. Anne
    Asked on 4/6/2010 by Anne Lear

    3 answers

    • A:

      Hello again Anne, The Phyllostachys nigra is classified as non-invasive (or clump-forming), but even so it has an eventual spread of 3m. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 4/12/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • A:

      Can certain types of bamboo be non-invasive? I have, apparently, a black bamboo. Many thanks Anne

      Answered on 4/12/2010 by Anne Lear
    • A:

      Hello Anne, The bamboos will not survive without drainage holes in the bottom of the pots, so this is essential. Sadly though even a tough plastic will deteriorate over time and may crack and split, so they will certainly help, but in the very long term the plants may break out. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 4/12/2010 by Anne Lear
  • Q:

    Bamboo information please for screeing

    Hello We need some soft, instant height in a small London garden - but limited to about 2 metres high overall. I am looking for bamboos, preferably yellow stemmed, and not too invasive. For example, how tall will your Phyllostachys aureosulcata spectabilis in the 2lt or 5lt pots grow? Is it very invasive? How tall does Fargesia murieliae (2lt pot) grow? Can either of these be snipped to keep them a given height? Is there another bamboo you would recommend instead? We will need 3 plants. Kind regards Beverley
    Asked on 2/15/2010 by Beverley Hilton

    2 answers

    • A:

      Dear Helen Many thanks. Will order Fargesia murieliae based on this. Kind regards Beverley

      Answered on 2/16/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • A:

      Hello Beverley, Unfortunately all the yellow stemmed bamboos we sell have an eventual spread of over 6m, so they are quite invasive. We do give all the eventual heights and spreads on our website up the top next to the pictures, so for example the Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. spectabilis in either a 2 or 5lt pot will eventually grow to 3m tall x 6m wide. The 2lt pots currently hold plants that are around 40-60cm tall, while the 5lt pots are now around 80-100cm tall. The Fargesia murieliae (which is the least invasive of all the bamboos and would be the best option) is currently around 40-60cm tall and will grow to 4m tall by 1.5m wide. Both of them can be clipped to keep them at around 2m tall. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 2/16/2010 by Beverley Hilton
  • Q:

    Bamboo for growing in containers

    Dear Sir/Madam, Would you please advise me on the suitability of Phyllostachys nigra and Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. spectabilis for container planting. If these are unsuitable, could you please recommend some bamboos that would be OK. Many thanks,
    Asked on 12/15/2009 by Anonymous

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello There, The Phyllostachys nigra would be fine in a really large pot as long as you make sure they are kept well watered, but the P. aureosulcata f. spectabilis is too big. Another good option would be Fargesia murieliae - just click on the following link to go straight to it. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/bamboo/exotics/fargesia-murieliae-/classid.1583/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 12/15/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Bamboo planting and controlling

    Hi I recently purchased six of these bamboo plants and am not sure how to plant them. Do they need to be in individual containers to avoid spreading? And how big should the containers be? I don't want to restrict the growth too much as I'm aiming for a screening effect in a corner of the garden at the back of a border, where a bit of spreading would be ok. Also might I be able to prune the spreading manually as the shoots appear? When it is suggested that the plants should be controlled with a 'non-perishable' barrier - what is that? Many thanks
    Asked on 10/29/2009 by harriet st johnston

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello, If you go for one of the spreading rather than clump-forming bamboos then you will either need to get a really a big plastic pot (at least a 50 litre pot) or a plastic dustbin with drainage holes in the bottom and sink this into the ground. Alternatively you need to create a barrier that won't break down like a thick wall of concrete and sink
      this at least 3' into the ground around the area you want them to spread. Unfortunately we don't sell either of these items, however they should be relatively easy to find. You can cut off the emerging stems that are growing in the wrong area, but this will not prevent the roots spreading and therefore the shoots will come up in a wider radius each year. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 11/2/2009 by harriet st johnston
  • Q:

    Bamboo for screening but how do I restrict it.....

    Hi I would like to create a bamboo screen along a fence roughly 25feet in length. I would like to use bamboos and have them blend into each other and be reasonably thick. Will I need a plastic barrier to reduce the spread or can this be maintained by removing any shoots that appear? Roughly how far will I need to space the plants? Do bamboo roots cause damage to house footings? Thank you Matt
    Asked on 10/26/2009 by Matt Oliver

    3 answers

    • A:

      Hello again Matt, We do have the eventual height and spread of all the plants on our site - these details can be found to the right of the pictures after you have clicked through to the individual plant cards. Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. spectabilis 3m tall x 6m wide Phyllostachys nigra 5m tall x 3m wide. As for the barrier, ideally it will need to be around 1m deep and really solid. Best regards, Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 10/26/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • A:

      Thanks Helen What is the spread of Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. spectabilis and Phyllostachys nigra? Does a barrier have to go below the roots or just either side? Matt

      Answered on 10/26/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • A:

      Hello Matt, Some bamboos can cause damage to the footings, but it really depends on how vigorous the plant is and how secure the footings are. The most compact (in spread) bamboo we sell is Fargesia murieliae, which has an eventual spread of 1.5m - just click on the following link to take you straight to it.
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/bamboo/exotics/fargesia-murieliae-/classid.1583/
      It will take time to grow to this, but if you want to restrict it, then you do need to make sure the roots can't spread and that will mean putting in some form of barrier. As for spacing, most people will plant these at 50cm intervals if you are trying to create a nice, dense
      screen. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 10/26/2009 by Matt Oliver
  • Q:

    Can I plant a Bamboo by a large conifer?

    Hi, I am thinking of planting a bamboo plant to use as a screen to maintain privacy. It needs to be tall and compact. Where I wish to place it, is alongside a conifer which is approx. 18/20 feet high. I eventually want to get rid of this conifer as it's dying off. If I were to get rid of it now, it would open up an area and hence we would be overlooked. I thought I would plant a bamboo and allow it to get established, before I got rid of the conifer. Any thoughts would be welcomed. The bamboo I have in mind is the Phyllostachys vivax f. aureocaulis. Awaiting your response Pat
    Asked on 10/24/2009 by Pat Jones

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Pat, I'm afraid it is going to be incredibly difficult to get anything to grow in the dry, shady conditions next to your existing conifer. Bamboos in particular like quite a lot of water, so won't cope with the competition for water, light and nutrients. I'm afraid then your best option would be to bite the bullet and get rid of the conifer and then invest in a more mature plant to replace it. I'm sorry not to be more help. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 10/26/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »

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