Photinia × fraseri 'Red Robin'

photinia

2 litre pot
pot size guide
£14.99 £11.99 Buy
+
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Evergreen shrub with glossy leaves and robin-red new shoots that top every stem by spring - the best background for small blue bulbs

Val Bourne - Garden Writer

All you can buy delivered for £4.99

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: most fertile, well-drained soils
  • Rate of growth: average to fast growing
  • Flowering period: April and May
  • Hardiness: frost hardy (needs winter protection)

    To find out more about how to plant a hedge, click here

    A splendid tree with green leaves that turn a rich copper in autumn. As a treeWith its parrot-red, glossy young foliage, and large, rounded heads of ivory flowers, this versatile evergreen shrub is deservedly popular. It colours up best in full sun, and will usually only flower in sunny conditions, although it makes a handsome background evergreen shrub in partial shade, too. It can cope with hard pruning, so can be trimmed to form an informal hedge or clipped into strong shapes. The flowers appear in mid and late spring, and are sometimes followed by spherical red fruit. In frost-prone areas, train as a wall shrub against a south or west-facing wall.

  • Garden care: To encourage a profusion of bright young leaves in late-spring or summer shorten the stems of established specimens by up to 15cm (6in), to just above an outward-facing bud. Apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted garden compost or manure around the base of the plant in early spring.

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8 Questions | 10 Answers
Displaying questions 1-8
  • Q:

    How tall are these plants supplied? Thanks in advance
    Asked on 8/18/2013 by Scout from Portsmouth

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello there
      They are approx 30cm in a 2lt pot.
      Hope this helps

      Answered on 8/19/2013 by Georgina from Crocus
  • Q:

    One of our 'robins' has red/dark brown speckles over the leaves (some examples are small on individual leaves, whilst other leaves have larger marks). Also, the leaves have been quite badly eaten over the last few months (no noticeable insects on leaves though). I suspect there may be two problems. Any thoughts? Your guidance would be most appreciated.
    Asked on 4/2/2013 by HolyPhotinias! from Brentwood, Essex

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      These plants are susceptible to fungal leaf spot, which can start out as a light speckle, but the spots can spread. This is usually a sign that the plant is stressed in some way, so try to make sure that it is kept well fed and watered. As for the leaves being eaten, I suspect this is being caused by caterpillars. Some caterpillars feed at night, so if you suspect they are still feeding, it may be worth going out with a torch. Alternatively you could spray the plants with a suitable systemic insecticide.

      Answered on 4/3/2013 by Helen from Crocus
  • Q:

    We're wanting to grow a boundary hedge of 2-3m in height, to be relatively quickly established. Our preferred option is Photinia xfraseri, but have a concern about frost hardiness. We're in Surrey, but reasonably high and exposed. Will Photinia cope with winter spells down to -5 and some harder frosts, or is is safer to go for something fully hardy like Rotundifolia? Thanks
    Asked on 3/1/2013 by Roland from Westhumble, Surrey

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      As these plants are only bordeline hardy, it may be a little risky. I suspect they will cope with temperatures as low as -5C, but they particularly dislike cold drying winds. I would be tempted to look around neighbouring gardens and see if you can spot them flourishing there, as this would give you a good indication that they will survive. Alternatively, the Prunus laurocerassus Rotundifolia is exceedingly tough.

      Answered on 3/4/2013 by Helen from Crocus
  • Q:

    Photinia 'Red Robin' has black spots on leaves? Also shrubs for sunny border please

    Hello Crocus Can you tell me why my Photinia 'Red Robin' has black spots on its leave - and how to treat it please! Many thanks Linda
    Asked on 4/7/2010 by Linda Binfield

    3 answers

    • A:

      Hello again Linda, Viburnum tinus 'French White' is an evergreen shrub that flowers in late winter and spring, so you could get too seasons of interest - just click on the following link to go straight to it. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/viburnum-tinus-french-white/classid.4484/ Mahonias will flower in winter too http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.mahonia/ while Daphne odora Aureomarginata is pretty early in the spring http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/daphne-odora-aureomarginata/classid.3751/ For shrubs that flower throughout the summer, then here are some of my favourites:- Ceanothus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.ceanothus/ Lavender http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.lavandula/ Hebe http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.hebe/ I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 4/7/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • A:

      I'll try that Helen - thank you. Also I have a lovely Crocus voucher to spend! I have just cleared an old sunny border in front of an ornamental wall. I have kept a large Hydrangea at the end of the border but would like a couple of shrubs to put alongside to give some winter colour. Do you have any suggestions that would complement the Hydrangea? Thank you for your prompt reply. Linda

      Answered on 4/7/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • A:

      Hello Linda, The most likely cause of these black spots is Fungal Leaf Spot. This can be caused by a number of things, but is usually a result of the plant being stressed in some way. It may be that it was slightly too cold in winter, or if it is in a pot it may need to be moved to a larger one, or planted out into the ground. Keep an eye on the watering and try to improve the general growing conditions and you should start to see new growth. If the black spots are really unsightly, you should pick off the affected leaves (being careful not to defoliate it completely) and give it a feed with a general purpose fertiliser like Growmore. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 4/7/2010 by Linda Binfield
  • Q:

    Hedging and Osmanthus plants

    Dear Crocus, I am looking for two Osmanthus burkwoodii plants but notice on your website that you only offer them for sale in 2 litre size. Do you have any larger Osmanthus burkwoodii plants? I am also looking for suggestions on which plants would make a good hedge. I am looking for something hardy, able to stand the frost, evergreen, not poisonous to horses and if possible, not just green possibly red / purple or variegated, any thoughts? Also, as these plants are grown in Surrey, will they be suitable to grow in the Scottish Borders? Many thanks, Jane
    Asked on 11/29/2009 by Janey Mitch

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Jane, I'm afraid we have all the plants we sell displayed on our website so we do not sell larger sizes of the Osmanthus. As for the hedging, if you click on the link below it will take you to our full range of hedging plants. Unfortunately we do not have anything that meets all your criteria, but if you click on the smaller images it will give you a lot more information on hardiness levels (fully hardy means they can cope with the weather in Scotland) as well as leaf colour etc. Unfortunately though I do not have a list of plants which are not poisonous to horses, but your local vet may be able to help you with this. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/hedging/plcid.30/ Best regards, Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 11/30/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Photinia ?? fraseri 'Red Robin' and Drimys winteri for front of house screening

    Dear Crocus, I am in need of a large plant/hedge to grow up my wall in the front garden to give us privacy from next door. Could you please confirm if these 2 shrubs, Photinia ?? fraseri 'Red Robin' and Drimys winteri would be suitable, or are there are any other shrubs/hedging plants that would be better? It will be in full sun, and I need it to be fast growing. Could you also let me know if it is possible to plant it so it gets established in October? Kind regards
    Asked on 10/6/2009 by Maria

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Maria, Both of these plants would be suitable in a sheltered garden, but it is worth keeping in mind their eventual height if they are not kept cut back. As for planting, autumn is ideal, but it will take around 1 year for any plant to become established after planting. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 10/7/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Hedging help please!

    Hi We currently have a Photinia hedge which we have just drastically pruned as it was getting out of hand, but we have decided that this may not be the best 'hedge' planting to have for our situation. We have a strip of land 1m wide x 2m long which we wish to screen from the road for privacy - but we park our car close by, so it cannot be a prickly hedge - it needs to be soft ! Can you please help us choose our hedging plants ? Ideally the hedge would eventually be about 2m tall, and evergreen. Many thanks - any ideas gratefully received. Karen
    Asked on 7/17/2009 by Anonymous

    1 answer

  • Q:

    Screening in pots

    Hi there I'm looking for screening ideas. I'm having a raised deck built and I would like some privacy from the neighbours, can any of the hedges be grown in troughs?
    Asked on 6/28/2009 by Michael Mullen

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello There, Many of the hedging plants can be grown in really large pots, as long as you make sure the plants are kept really well fed and watered. The following are some of the best options. Photinia, Elaeagnus, Prunus laurocerassus, Pyracantha and Phyllostachys I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 7/4/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
Displaying questions 1-8

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