Monarda 'Scorpion'

bergamot

2 litre pot £8.99 Buy
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1 year guarantee

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: July to September
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Whorls of vibrant, reddish-purple flowers surrounded by purple bracts from July to September, and aromatic, mid green leaves. This striking bergamot is perfect towards the back of a sunny, well-drained, moisture retentive border. Disease resistant and taller than other varieties, the tall purple stems must be supported with brushwood or canes before the flowers appear.

  • Garden care: Most monardas can be capricious, and do not like soil that is either too damp or too dry. These plants are susceptible to powdery mildew, and while this rarely causes long-term damage, it can look unsightly towards the end of the summer. You can help reduce this by applying a 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted organic matter around each plant. Resist cutting bergamot back in autumn, since the stiff, vertical stems look good all winter.


Penstemon 'Sour Grapes'

beard tongue

Greyish-blue flowers with metallic sheen

£5.99 Buy

Echinacea purpurea

coneflower

Long lasting, rosy purple flowers.

£7.99 Buy

Eryngium yuccifolium

button eryngo

Distinctive strap-shaped foliage

£5.99 Buy

Perovskia 'Blue Spire'

Russian sage

Violet-blue flowers and silvery foliage. Great planted en masse

£9.99 Buy
 

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1 Question | 1 Answer
Displaying question 1
  • Q:

    My Phlox and Bergamot leaves are browning

    Hi there I have a Phlox and some Bergamot which I bought from you a while back and whilst it's growing really well, I am finding that the lower leaves on the Phlox are going brown then yellow. I've been taking them off but as it's happening all the the way up the plant, bit by bit, it's going to look quite bare soon! I wondered why they are going yellow, and what I could do about it please? More or less the same with the Bergamot except that the leaves are going brown around the edges. Should I be taking those off and is there anything I could do to prevent it? Many thanks and best wishes Debbie
    Asked on 6/16/2009 by Deborah Newbury

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Debbie, It is quite normal for the older leaves on herbaceous perennials to die off as they are putting on new growth, so I would not be too concerned. Towards the end of summer, they will die back completely and in spring next year the cycle will begin again. If the plants look really tatty, then just remove the older foliage. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 6/17/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
Displaying question 1

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