Lonicera periclymenum 'Graham Thomas'

honeysuckle

3 litre pot
pot size guide
£12.99 Buy
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Nothing beats the sweet honeyed fragrance perfuming the warm, soft mellow air of a summer’s evening. Remember to take hardwood cuttings in autmn of this indispensable plant –they are easy to do and almost foolproof

Lucy Summers - Greenfingers Guides

1 year guarantee
All you can buy delivered for £4.99

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: July to September
  • Flower colour: white ageing to yellow
  • Other features: bright-red berries in hot summers, which may cause a mild stomach upset if ingested
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Fabulously fragrant, large, tubular, white flowers, ageing to yellow, from July to September and oval, mid-green leaves. This vigorous, deciduous climber will soon cover a boundary wall or fence in a sunny site. Later flowering than many other varieties of honeysuckle it's ideal for a cottage or wildlife garden.

  • Garden care: Cut back established plants after flowering, removing a third of the flowering shoots. Apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted compost or manure around the base of the plant in early spring.

Clematis Arctic Queen ('Evitwo') (PBR)

clematis (group 2)

Large double white flowers

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Rosa 'Gloire de Dijon'

rose Gloire de Dijon (climbing hybrid tea)

Intensely fragrant flowers

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Rosa 'Climbing Iceberg'

rose Climbing Iceberg (climbing floribunda)

Graceful addition to the garden

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7 Questions | 9 Answers
Displaying questions 1-7
  • Q:

    I planted the above to climb over a pergola 3 years ago and the rate of growth has been fantastic as has the abundance of flowers. Last year The plant suffered from mildew so I treated it with an anti fungal spray which so far seems to have worked. Earlier this year I carried out limited pruning . Unfortunately the floral display this season has been very disappointing compared to previous years can you offer any advise where I may have gone wrong. I do feed with chicken pellets.
    Asked on 6/21/2014 by Old Adam from Tyneside

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      Loniceras are prone to powdery mildew I'm afraid, so do make sure your plant is kept well watered, and spray with a good fungicide if necessary. Also any pruning should be tackled immediately after it has finished flowering, as if it is done at any other time of the year it will have an effect on the flower production. All you can do now is make sure it is kept well fed and watered and next year you should have an abundance of flowers again.

      Answered on 6/26/2014 by helen from crocus
  • Q:

    I purchased the above early 2013 and it flowered beautifully last summer. However, this year all of the buds are dropping off before actually flowering. What is the reason for this?
    I have also noticed that another Honeysuckle I have had for a couple of years is doing exactly the same.
    Asked on 5/21/2014 by BennyP from Chelmsford, Essex

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      This usually happens when a plant is stressed in some way, so make sure it is getting lots of water and give it a feed with a good, general purpose fertiliser such as Vitax Q4.

      Answered on 5/22/2014 by helen from crocus
  • Q:

    Plant for an east facing wall

    Hi, Could you help me with the choice of plant for an east facing wall (it will get early morning sun). The wall is 8 foot high and 20 foot long. I liked the idea of a climbing Hydrangea but this appears to grow to 15 metres. Is there a similar evergreen plant that you could recommend? Many thanks Sue
    Asked on 1/20/2010 by Sue Mather

    2 answers

    • A:

      Hi Helen Many thanks I think we will go for the Hydrangea Regards Sue

      Answered on 1/20/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • A:

      Hello Sue, The Hydrangea is really quite slow growing and you can easily cut it back if it does get too big, so if you really like it, I would be tempted to go for it. Alternatively you could opt for one of the Loniceras or a Hedera, both of which can be trimmed back if they get over-large. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 1/20/2010 by Sue Mather
  • Q:

    Climbers for North East facing wall

    Hi I was just wondering if you could give me some advice please. Our house is a Victorian end of terrace - the side of the house faces North-East. The side of the house is very bare (only two tiny windows on ground floor) and we would like to grow something up the wall. We have had trouble with graffiti in the past and want to paint the side of the house and then put trellis to about 7ft. Can you suggest something that would grow quite quickly please. Kind Regards Joanna
    Asked on 11/6/2009 by Joanna Swainson

    2 answers

    • A:

      Thank you so much Helen, this helps a lot.

      Answered on 11/9/2009 by Joanna Swainson
    • A:

      Hello Joanna, If you click on the link below it will take you to our fast growing climbers, which will cope with low light levels. If you click into each card you can then see the eventual height and spread of each plant - some of them are pretty big. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/plcid.15/vid.186/vid.237/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 11/9/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Climbing Plant on a North-Facing Trellis

    Dear Sir/Madam, Could you recommend a climbing plant for a trellis? The trellis in question is set against my neighbour's wall, and faces northward. So, I'm looking for a plant to provide maximum, attractive, fast-growing coverage. Yours faithfully, Peter
    Asked on 8/18/2009 by Peter Lawson

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Peter, I have done a search on our Plant Finder and if you click on the following link it will take you to all the climbers which will grow on a north facing aspect and are fast growing (although keep in mind most plants are going into their dormant period now) http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/plcid.15/vid.186/vid.237/ I hope this helps.

      Answered on 8/19/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Plants to deter cats

    Hello, my tiny terrace garden was recently made over at some expense but my 2 beloved moggies have ruined the one flower bed by using it as a loo-I am about to spend yet more money on having it cleaned up but how do I deter the cats from ruining it again? They are outdoor cats and use the catflap and there is nowhere indoors to put a litter tray anyway. Friends suggested several centimetres of woodchips? on the soil would put them off but I would value your advice before I invest. Also, which perfumed lilies are poisonous to cats?-or are they all? I am not thinking of poisoning the 2 moggies but I would like some lilies in pots but not if they are going to harm the cats. Also, suggestions of perfumed climbing shrubs that will stand shade. Many thanks Sonia
    Asked on 7/23/2009 by Sonia Richardson

    1 answer

  • Q:

    Why don't the climbers flower

    My aunt aged 83 has a Jasmine and Honeysuckle growing beautifully up an east facing wall getting plenty of warmth and sunshine. They were planted about 5 1/2 years ago. The Jasmine flowered briefly in its second year of growth but hasn't flowered since and the Honeysuckle hasn't bloomed at all. Both plants are very healthy in every other respect. Can you please advise.Thanking you in anticipation. Sarah
    Asked on 6/14/2009 by Sarah King

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello there, The most likely cause is a lack of sun, although other factors could include pruning at the wrong time of the year, or not enough feed or water. If you want to give them a bit of a push, then feed them with Sulphate of Potash (following the manufacturers instructions).I hope this helps, Helen.

      Answered on 2/28/2012 by helen.derrin
Displaying questions 1-7

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