Lonicera × tellmanniana

honeysuckle

2 litre pot
pot size guide
£12.99 Buy
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  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average to fast-growing
  • Flowering period: May and July
  • Hardiness: fully hardy


    Bright, tubular flowers, the colour of burnt amber and flushed red in bud, smother this honeysuckle from May to July. This gorgeous, deciduous climber looks lovely as the backdrop for a planting scheme based on 'hot' colours. One of the most unusual honeysuckles, it flowers best on a south-west wall in full sun to light shade with its roots in deep shade.

  • Garden care: Cut back established plants after flowering, removing a third of the flowering shoots. Apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted compost or manure around the base of the plant in early spring.

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3 Questions | 4 Answers
Displaying questions 1-3
  • Q:

    Plant for an east facing wall

    Hi, Could you help me with the choice of plant for an east facing wall (it will get early morning sun). The wall is 8 foot high and 20 foot long. I liked the idea of a climbing Hydrangea but this appears to grow to 15 metres. Is there a similar evergreen plant that you could recommend? Many thanks Sue
    Asked on 1/20/2010 by Sue Mather

    2 answers

    • A:

      Hi Helen Many thanks I think we will go for the Hydrangea Regards Sue

      Answered on 1/20/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • A:

      Hello Sue, The Hydrangea is really quite slow growing and you can easily cut it back if it does get too big, so if you really like it, I would be tempted to go for it. Alternatively you could opt for one of the Loniceras or a Hedera, both of which can be trimmed back if they get over-large. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 1/20/2010 by Sue Mather
  • Q:

    Plants to deter cats

    Hello, my tiny terrace garden was recently made over at some expense but my 2 beloved moggies have ruined the one flower bed by using it as a loo-I am about to spend yet more money on having it cleaned up but how do I deter the cats from ruining it again? They are outdoor cats and use the catflap and there is nowhere indoors to put a litter tray anyway. Friends suggested several centimetres of woodchips? on the soil would put them off but I would value your advice before I invest. Also, which perfumed lilies are poisonous to cats?-or are they all? I am not thinking of poisoning the 2 moggies but I would like some lilies in pots but not if they are going to harm the cats. Also, suggestions of perfumed climbing shrubs that will stand shade. Many thanks Sonia
    Asked on 7/23/2009 by Sonia Richardson

    1 answer

  • Q:

    Why don't the climbers flower

    My aunt aged 83 has a Jasmine and Honeysuckle growing beautifully up an east facing wall getting plenty of warmth and sunshine. They were planted about 5 1/2 years ago. The Jasmine flowered briefly in its second year of growth but hasn't flowered since and the Honeysuckle hasn't bloomed at all. Both plants are very healthy in every other respect. Can you please advise.Thanking you in anticipation. Sarah
    Asked on 6/14/2009 by Sarah King

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello there, The most likely cause is a lack of sun, although other factors could include pruning at the wrong time of the year, or not enough feed or water. If you want to give them a bit of a push, then feed them with Sulphate of Potash (following the manufacturers instructions).I hope this helps, Helen.

      Answered on 2/28/2012 by helen.derrin
Displaying questions 1-3

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