Ligustrum ovalifolium

oval leaf privet - Hedging Range

25 plants - 40-60cm
pot size guide
£44.99 Buy
+
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50 plants - 40-60cm
pot size guide
£74.99 Buy
+
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100 plants - 40-60cm
pot size guide
£129.99 Buy
+
-
1 year guarantee
All you can buy delivered for £4.99

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: any well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: July and August
  • Flower colour: white
  • Other features: all parts of the plant may cause severe discomfort if ingested
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    The Royal Horticultural Society bare root hedging range is a very low cost way of planting a hedge. The bare root plants are only available to buy and plant when dormant. (November-March) These plants, with known seed provenence, are grown in 220 acres of rich Herefordshire soil. As they are dispatched directly from the fields, rather than through a nursery, they are much fresher than imported or even stored plants. RHS bare root plants are grown through low input horticultural methods. Plants are rotated with pigs annually, to improve soil condition. Water is harvested in the winter for use in the summer. No heat or polytunnels are used and, as the plants are dispatched direct from the fields, transport is kept to a minimum.

    To find out more about how to plant a hedge, click here

    Dense clusters of white flowers in July and August followed by shiny, spherical, black fruit and oval, rich-green leaves. This vigorous oval leaf privet makes an excellent, pollution-tolerant hedge for an urban or suburban site. Thriving in sun or shade, the lustrous, dark green foliage provides an evergreen backdrop for ornamental and feature plants.

  • Garden care: Plants grown as free-standing specimens require minimal pruning - where necessary remove any misplaced or diseased branches in late-winter or early spring. Trim hedging plants twice yearly - in May and August. After pruning apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted compost or manure around the base of the plant.

    Please note that as we grow the hedging especially for you, we need to take full payment when you place your order so as to reserve stock for you. The bareroot plants will then be despatched to you during November.

  • Harmful if eaten

Choisya ternata

Mexican orange blossom

Wonderfully scented white flowers

£9.99 Buy

Pyracantha Saphyr Orange ('Cadange') (PBR)

firethorn

Handsome orange berries

£12.99 Buy

Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple'

smoke bush

Magnificent smoke-like plumes

£12.99 Buy

Crataegus monogyna

common hawthorn - hedging range

Licenced by the Royal Horticultural Society

£29.99 Buy
 

Do you want to ask a question about this?

If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
2 Questions | 2 Answers
Displaying questions 1-2
  • Q:

    What length would 100 plants create? I need a privet to cover a wall of 5m in length, circa 2.5m high. Thanks
    Asked on 7/22/2013 by David from Manchester

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      To create a nice dense hedge, I would recommend planting them at 30cm intervals. Therefore 100 plants will screen an area measuring 30m in length.

      Answered on 7/23/2013 by Helen from Crocus
  • Q:

    Hedging and Osmanthus plants

    Dear Crocus, I am looking for two Osmanthus burkwoodii plants but notice on your website that you only offer them for sale in 2 litre size. Do you have any larger Osmanthus burkwoodii plants? I am also looking for suggestions on which plants would make a good hedge. I am looking for something hardy, able to stand the frost, evergreen, not poisonous to horses and if possible, not just green possibly red / purple or variegated, any thoughts? Also, as these plants are grown in Surrey, will they be suitable to grow in the Scottish Borders? Many thanks, Jane
    Asked on 11/29/2009 by Janey Mitch

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Jane, I'm afraid we have all the plants we sell displayed on our website so we do not sell larger sizes of the Osmanthus. As for the hedging, if you click on the link below it will take you to our full range of hedging plants. Unfortunately we do not have anything that meets all your criteria, but if you click on the smaller images it will give you a lot more information on hardiness levels (fully hardy means they can cope with the weather in Scotland) as well as leaf colour etc. Unfortunately though I do not have a list of plants which are not poisonous to horses, but your local vet may be able to help you with this. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/hedging/plcid.30/ Best regards, Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 11/30/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
Displaying questions 1-2

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