Lathyrus odoratus 'King's High Scent'

modern grandiflora sweet pea King's High Scent

All you can buy delivered for £4.99
These sweet peas are autumn sown and grown in root trainers to promote longer deep roots. They have been grown under a cold polythene tunnel and we will despatch them as soon as they are ready to be planted outside. (See the dates above for the estimated despatch date)

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, humus-rich, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average to fast-growing
  • Flowering period: June to September
  • Flower colour: Creamy-yellow with a violet picotee edge
  • Other features: the flowers have a knock-out scent
  • Hardiness: hardy annual

    The delicate picotee colouring of this sweet pea, coupled with the flowers unusually powerful scent, make this a beautiful addition to the flower garden. Where space is at a premium, try filling large pots with them, and top it with a woven obelisk that they can scramble over. Throughout summer you will have a stunning feature for your terrace.

    In our (not very scientific) sweet pea trial on the nursery, we found that this variety had the most fantastic scent of all. The flowers were held on very long stems approximately 6-9" long, but it only has a few flowers left in August.

    All the sweet-peas in our trial produced significantly better plants when the seeds were sown in autumn rather than spring.

  • Garden care: Incorporate lots of well-rotted organic matter in the planting hole. To make sure you keep the plants in top condition spray regularly with a fungicide as all sweet peas are prone to mildew, and feed with a high potash fertiliser, such as Tomorite for plenty of flowers. Don't forget to keep cutting the flowers so that you get plenty more!

Slim multi-purpose soft-tie

Slim multi-purpose soft-tie

Tie is designed for use with the thinner, delicate stems of climbing annuals

£4.99 Buy

Willow poles for sweet peas

Willow poles for sweet peas

Ideal for runner beans and sweet peas

£9.99 Buy
 

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1 Question | 1 Answer
Displaying question 1
  • Q:

    What does 'pinching out' mean?

    I would like to buy some Sweet Peas however, I'm not sure what the term 'pinching out the tips' means. Any clues on how you would do this?
    Asked on 3/29/2006 by Ms Sau Min Chang

    1 answer

    • A:

      Pinching out, simply means removing the growing tip of the plant. This encourages the plants to produce lateral shoots, which will result in bushier growth. All you need to do is nip out the top two leaves and growing point of each plant using your fingers or a small pair of scissors.

      Answered on 4/3/2006 by Crocus
Displaying question 1

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