Echinacea 'Irresistible' (PBR)

coneflower

9cm pot
pot size guide
£8.99 Buy
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2+1 FREE - 9cm pots
pot size guide
£17.98 Buy
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  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: most soils, except very dry or boggy
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: June to September
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    First introduced onto the market in 2010, we think we are one of the first suppliers of this gorgeous new coneflower here in the UK. It is a double-flowered form, producing bright orange-pink blooms, which look spectacular throughout the summer. Its compact habit makes it suitable for pots and containers, or drift it through the middle of the border.

  • Garden care: Lift and divide congested colonies in autumn or spring. In autumn cut back all dead flower stems to the ground. Coneflowers benefit from a spring or autumn mulch with well-rotted compost.

Achillea 'Terracotta'

yarrow

Long-lasting, rich terracotta flowers

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Crocosmia √ó crocosmiiflora 'Solfatare'

montbretia

Apricot-yellow flowers

£8.99 Buy
 

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5 Questions | 6 Answers
Displaying questions 1-5
  • Q:

    How many Echinaceas in a pot?

    Hi, I want to buy Echinacea 'Kim's Knee High' and 'Kim's White Mop' - is there only one plant in a 2 ltr pot, and do you sell the corms separately? Thank you
    Asked on 12/29/2009 by Gordon White

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello There, There will just be one plant per 2 or 3lt pot, but unfortunately these are not grown from corms. You can divide over-large clumps in autumn, but they tend to resent disturbance so it is best kept to a minimum. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 12/30/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Can I plant Echnicea in the autumn?

    Dear Crocus, I have been looking for a plant called Echnicea purpurea 'Magnus', and I see that you have some on your website. Is now a good time of year to buy a plant, or is it better to wait until spring? If so I will order one now. Perhaps you could let me know. Many thanks. Yours, Kate
    Asked on 10/2/2009 by P and K Kaye, York

    2 answers

    • A:

      Thanks Helen, I will order one on line. Yours, Kate

      Answered on 10/5/2009 by P and K Kaye, York
    • A:

      Hello Kate, Autumn is a great time to plant these, unless you have very heavy or wet soil that does not dry out in winter - in which case you should wait until spring. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 10/5/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Whats wrong with my Echinacea?

    Hello My newly planted Echinacea 'Harvest Moon' is alive, but is only about 6 inches tall and the leaves have curled up. What do you advise? Water? Food? Thank you Roger
    Asked on 6/24/2009 by Roger Parker

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Roger, I'm sorry to hear that you are having a few problems with your plants. Echinaceas like reliable moisture in summer, so I suspect yours may be a little too dry. If the soil was well prepared before planting, with lots of organic matter dug in, and the pH is relatively normal, all you need to do is make sure they are watered and fed with a general purpose fertiliser. I hope this helps, Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 6/26/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Which plants are Deer proof?

    I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.
    Asked on 2/3/2006 by david

    1 answer

    • A:

      Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

      Answered on 2/6/2006 by Crocus
  • Q:

    What can I plant that the deers won't eat?

    What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.
    Asked on 3/18/2005 by Kelly L. Sliker

    1 answer

    • A:

      Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

      Answered on 3/21/2005 by Crocus
Displaying questions 1-5

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