Dryopteris wallichiana

fern

2 litre pot
pot size guide
£8.99 Buy
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1 year guarantee
All you can buy delivered for £4.99

  • Position: partial shade
  • Soil: moist, humus-rich soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    A tough, hardy fern that is native to the Himalayas. In spring, Wallich's wood fern produces bright green, shuttlecock-like fronds on upright, hairy stems, up to 90cm high. Less fine in appearance than many other ferns, it nonetheless makes a dramatic statement in a woodland garden or under deciduous trees. Once established, it will even grow in dry shade. When the leaves die back, the space can be filled with early-flowering snowdrops.

  • Garden care: Incorporate lots of well rotted leaf mould, composted pine needles of garden compost into the planting hole. Cut back dead fronds in winter.

Geranium sanguineum

bloody cranesbill

Magenta flowers. Good in acid soil

£7.99 Buy

Bergenia 'Silberlicht'

elephant's ears (syn. Silverlight )

Early flowers in spring

£7.99 Buy

Lamprocapnos spectabilis 'Alba'

bleeding heart (syn. Dicentra spectabilis Alba)

Arching sprays of delicate, heart-shaped white flowers

£7.99 Buy

Helleborus argutifolius

Corsican hellebore

Evergreen, with nodding, pale green flowers in early spring

£8.99 Buy

Digitalis purpurea

foxglove

A naturalising foxglove

£2.49 Buy

Tree fern feed

Tree fern feed

Helps to encourage vigorous foliage and root growth

£6.99 Buy

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
CrocusDryopteris wallichiana
 
5.0

(based on 1 review)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 3 Stars

     

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Reviewed by 1 customer

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(4 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

really beautiful

By suppie

from northamptonshire

Pros

  • Accurate Instructions
  • Attractive
  • Hardy
  • Healthy
  • Stunning
  • Versatile

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Edge Of Woodland Garden
    • Garden
    • In A Pot

    Comments about Crocus Dryopteris wallichiana:

    I can't fault this plant,when it captures your eye
    its hard to look away.
    The dark hairy stems,contrast beautifully with the lush green fronds.

    • Your Gardening Experience:
    • Experienced

    Comment on this review

     

    Do you want to ask a question about this?

    If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
    2 Questions | 2 Answers
    Displaying questions 1-2
    • Q:

      Which plants are Deer proof?

      I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.
      Asked on 2/3/2006 by david

      1 answer

      • A:

        Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

        Answered on 2/6/2006 by Crocus
    • Q:

      What can I plant that the deers won't eat?

      What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.
      Asked on 3/18/2005 by Kelly L. Sliker

      1 answer

      • A:

        Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

        Answered on 3/21/2005 by Crocus
    Displaying questions 1-2

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