Dryopteris erythrosora

buckler fern

1.5 litre pot £9.99 Buy
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The autumn fern has a russet-red underside to its leaves but it’s still pristine enough to flatter snowdrops in early winter- before its new red-backed fronds appear

Val Bourne - Garden Writer

1 year guarantee

  • Position: partial shade
  • Soil: moist, humus-rich soil
  • Rate of growth: slow-growing
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    This striking deciduous fern has triangular-shaped fronds, which are coppery-red when young and slowly mature to dark green. One of our recommended plants, it needs plenty of moisture and contrasts beautifully with evergreen ferns and other woodland plants.

  • Garden care: Incorporate lots of well-rotted leaf mould, composted pine needles or garden compost into the planting hole. Cut back decayed fronds in winter to allow new growth to emerge.


Helleborus niger

Christmas rose

Bowl-shaped, white flowers in the depths of winter

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Polystichum setiferum (Divisilobum Group) 'Herrenhausen'

soft shield fern

Evergreen fern with fine, filegree fronds.

£8.99 Buy

Lamprocapnos spectabilis

bleeding heart (syn. Dicentra spectabilis)

Arching sprays of pink, heart-shaped flowers

£7.99 Buy

Polygonatum × hybridum

common Solomon's seal (Syn. Polygonatum multiflorum)

Creamy white flowers blue-black berries

£8.99 Buy

Polystichum setiferum

soft shield fern

A large, evergreen fern

£8.99 Buy

Hosta 'Big Daddy' (sieboldiana hybrid)

plantain lily

Enormous, grey-green, puckered leaves

£7.49 Buy

Tree fern feed

Tree fern feed

Helps to encourage vigorous foliage and root growth

£6.99 Buy
 

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3 Questions | 4 Answers
Displaying questions 1-3
  • Q:

    Hanging baskets for shade please

    Hello There, I want to plant up some hanging baskets with interesting foliage plants like ferns. They will then stay in a shady spot. Can you help with a few suggestions?
    Asked on 7/17/2009 by Mike Simpson

    2 answers

    • A:

      Hi Helen To let you know I have just ordered all of your suggestions below. Thanks again for taking the time to help

      Answered on 7/17/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • A:

      Hello There, You could use any of the following plants, but as they are reasonably mature they will really fill the baskets.Hosta
      Devon Green
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/hosta-devon-green/classid.2000009302/
      Carex oshimensis Evergold
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/grasses/carex-oshimensis-evergold/classid.680/
      Dryopteris erythosora
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/ferns/dryopteris-erythrosora-/classid.1823/ Hosta undulata var. albomarginata
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/hosta-undulata-var.-albomarginata/classid.3032/ Asplenium
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/ferns/asplenium-scolopendrium-/classid.1808/
      Blechnum
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/ferns/blechnum-spicant-/classid.1816/

      Answered on 7/22/2009 by Mike Simpson
  • Q:

    Which plants are Deer proof?

    I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.
    Asked on 2/3/2006 by david

    1 answer

    • A:

      Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

      Answered on 2/6/2006 by Crocus
  • Q:

    What can I plant that the deers won't eat?

    What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.
    Asked on 3/18/2005 by Kelly L. Sliker

    1 answer

    • A:

      Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

      Answered on 3/21/2005 by Crocus
Displaying questions 1-3

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