Digitalis purpurea 'Excelsior Group'

foxglove Excelsior Group

2 litre pot
pot size guide
£7.99 Buy
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Tall spikes of pink thimbles heavily blotched with maroon and white and the ultimate partner for old-fashioned roses of every shade - a bee pleaser too

Val Bourne - Garden Writer

All you can buy delivered for £4.99

  • Position:full sun to partial shade
  • Soil: moist, humus-rich soil
  • Rate of growth: average to fast-growing
  • Flowering period: May to July
  • Flower colour: purple, pink, creamy-yellow or white
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Tall spires of large, well-spaced, tubular flowers in soft shades of purple, pin k, creamy-yellow or white, each one with throats spotted maroon or purple appea r from May to July. These pastel-coloured foxgloves are perfect for the back of a large cottage-style border. Although short-lived, given the right conditions they will perpetuate by self-seeding.

  • Garden care: Ensure that the soil is kept moist in summer. After flowering cut back the flowered spikes to encourage more sideshoots. Cut down to the ground after flowering. Apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-ro tted organic matter around the plant in early spring.

    These plants are mainly biennial, although they will produce plenty of new sideshoots and self-seed freely.


  • CAUTION toxic if eaten

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bearded iris

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Pulmonaria 'Sissinghurst White'

lungwort

Pure white flowers green leaves with white spots

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Asplenium scolopendrium Crispum Cristatum Group

hart's tongue fern

A showy fern for a shady border

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Dryopteris filix-mas

male fern

Ideal for the woodland garden

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Hosta sieboldiana var. elegans

plantain lily

Heart shaped, pale green leaves and fragrant flowers

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Polygonatum × hybridum

common Solomon's seal (Syn. Polygonatum multiflorum)

Creamy white flowers blue-black berries

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Aconitum napellus

monkshood

Gorgeous deep blue flowers glow in the shade

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Geranium phaeum 'Lily Lovell'

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Iridescent saucers of purple flowers. Good for shade

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3 Questions | 3 Answers
Displaying questions 1-3
  • Q:

    When should I plant Delphiniums, Foxgloves and Hollyhocks, and what will I gett in a pot?

    Hi there, I have a brand new, small, garden (approx. 36' by 30') and am in the process of creating borders. I'm aiming for fairly deep borders as I would like loads of cottage garden flowers. I am thinking of having a few evergreen / deciduous shrubs here and there to form some permanent interest. My gardening knowledge is more or less at the 'beginner' stage so I need some advice please. Is it okay to plant the shrubs now as long as the ground isn't frozen? When should I plant the perennials and annuals? Spring time? When I order for example Hollyhocks, Delphiniums and Foxgloves, and what do I get in the pot? Is it one plant that will produce one flowerhead? If I wanted to make a big colour impact, would I need to order loads of each plant? I look forward to hearing from you. Many thanks, Lynn
    Asked on 12/10/2009 by Wilson Lynn

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Lynn, You can plant any fully hardy plant at any time of the year
      as long as the ground is not frozen, but the ideal times are spring or
      autumn. Annuals only live for 1 year, some will flower in winter, while
      others flower in summer, so the planting time will depend on what type
      they are. As for the herbaceous perennials, these can be planted anytime
      as long as they are hardy, you will get 1 plant per pot. Each plant and
      species will produce flowers in different way. The ones you mention
      will generally produce 1 main flowerspike and a couple of smaller
      side-shoots, and if you cut them back when they start to fade you can
      often encourage a second flush later in the year. Finally then, if you
      want big impact, then yes you will need a lot of plants. I hope this
      helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 12/11/2009 by Wilson Lynn
  • Q:

    Which plants are Deer proof?

    I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.
    Asked on 2/3/2006 by david

    1 answer

    • A:

      Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

      Answered on 2/6/2006 by Crocus
  • Q:

    What can I plant that the deers won't eat?

    What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.
    Asked on 3/18/2005 by Kelly L. Sliker

    1 answer

    • A:

      Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

      Answered on 3/21/2005 by Crocus
Displaying questions 1-3

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