Crocus × luteus 'Golden Yellow'

crocus bulbs

20 bulbs £4.99 Email me when in stock
60 bulbs £12.00 Email me when in stock
1 year guarantee

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: gritty, poor to moderately fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: February and March
  • Flower colour: golden yellow
  • Other features: slender, strap-shaped, mid-green leaves
  • Hardiness: fully hardy
  • Bulb size: 7/8

    As the name suggests, the colour of these flowers is a rich golden yellow. This is a strong- grower that is ideal for naturalising through lawns and meadows. Each bulb may produce up to 5 flowers, so you will usually get a very generous show too.

  • Garden care: Plant bulbs in naturalistic drifts 10cm (4in) deep in September or October.

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  • Q:

    Why do the birds eat my yellow crocus and cause them to go blind, but leave the mauve variety? Is there any way of stopping them?
    Asked on 3/2/2013 by Old gardener from Watford

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      I'm afraid I have never heard of this before so I am at a bit of a loss, but I suspect it may have something to do with the way birds see colours. Strange though that the birds have taken a liking to yours, when you will see yellow crocus flourishing in other parks and gardens. The best way to stop them however is to either put a physical barrier over the bulbs (like chicken wire), or put up a deterrent (ie something that creates movement or looks like a predator).

      I'm really sorry not to be more help,

      Answered on 3/4/2013 by Helen from Crocus
Displaying question 1

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