Crataegus monogyna

common hawthorn - hedging range

25 plants - 40-60cm £29.99 Buy
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50 plants - 40-60cm £49.99 Buy
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100 plants - 40-60cm £89.99 Buy
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1 year guarantee

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: any soil (except water-logged)
  • Rate of growth: average to fast-growing
  • Flowering period: May
  • Flower colour: white
  • Other features: spherical, glossy, dark red fruit; ideal for the wildlife garden
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    The Royal Horticultural Society bare root hedging range is a very low cost way of planting a hedge. The bare root plants are only available to buy and plant when dormant. (November-March) These plants, with known seed provenence, are grown in 220 acres of rich Herefordshire soil. As they are dispatched directly from the fields, rather than through a nursery, they are much fresher than imported or even stored plants. RHS bare root plants are grown through low input horticultural methods. Plants are rotated with pigs annually, to improve soil condition. Water is harvested in the winter for use in the summer. No heat or polytunnels are used and, as the plants are dispatched direct from the fields, transport is kept to a minimum.

    To find out more about how to plant a hedge, click here

    Fragrant white flowers in May, followed by spherical, glossy, dark red fruit, and deeply lobed, glossy, dark green leaves. Hawthorn makes a great specimen tree or boundary hedge for a range of settings. A valuable food source and refuge for native birds and insects, the spiny thorns serve as a deterrent against potential intruders.

  • Garden care: In late winter or early spring remove any misplaced, diseased or crossing branches. After pruning apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted garden compost or manure around the base of the plant.

    Please note that as we grow the hedging especially for you, we need to take full payment when you place your order so as to reserve stock for you. The bareroot plants will then be despatched to you during November.

Rosa canina

dog rose hedging (shrub) - 25 plants - 30-40cm

A fast growing native rose

£34.99 Buy

Primula vulgaris

primrose

Our native, woodland primrose.

£5.99 Buy

Digitalis purpurea 'Excelsior Group'

foxglove Excelsior Group

Perfect for a cottage-style garden

£7.99 Buy

Lonicera periclymenum 'Serotina'

late Dutch honeysuckle

Late flowering, with showy white and purple blooms

£12.99 Buy

Convallaria majalis

lily-of-the-valley

Scented white bells in spring

£7.99 Buy

Acer campestre

field maple - hedging range

Robust and fast growing hedge

£39.99 Buy
 

Do you want to ask a question about this?

If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
8 Questions | 10 Answers
Displaying questions 1-8
  • Q:

    Hedging Advice

    Dear Crocus Helpline We are looking for hedging ideas for the bottom of our garden with the aim of providing screening which can be easily maintained at around 10 feet tall. The soil is clay, and standing water tends to collect in one small area when we have very heavy rainfall. We have the usual wood feather board fencing in place which we need to retain, but there is no other planting to consider apart from lawn (in fact the garden is nothing but lawn!). The area we need to plant measures approx 11mt across. As our budget is tight, we need suggestions for smaller, fast-growing plants, rather than mature, slow-growing ones to give us the screening asap. We look forward to hearing from you in due course. With thanks
    Asked on 4/13/2010 by Selina Edwards

    2 answers

    • A:

      Hello There, The cheapest option will be the bare-root whips, but these are only sold when the plants are completely dormant from autumn to early spring. Failing that you can buy 2 or 3lt pots, which should be planted at 30cm intervals if you want a nice, dense hedge. If the soil remains waterlogged for any length of time, you will have problems getting most plants to grow, but from what you say it doesn't sound too boggy, so I would recommend the following:- Crataegus http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/hedging/crataegus-monogyna-/classid.1044/ Elaeagnus http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/hedging/elaeagnus-%C3%97-ebbingei-limelight/classid.3775/ Prunus laurocerassus http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/hedging/prunus-laurocerasus-rotundifolia/classid.4306/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 4/15/2010 by Selina Edwards
    • A:

      Dear Helen Thanks you so much for your prompt reply. We will look forward to looking into your suggestions.

      Answered on 4/16/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Common Hawthorn -Crataegus monogyna hedging plants

    Dear Crocus I want to plant a hedge along a 2m wall in my front garden (north facing) that is going to be a wildlife garden for children. I would like to buy common hawthorn from your hedging range '10' bareroot 45-60cm -Crataegus monogyna. Does this mean 10 actual plants? As you can tell I am not an experienced gardener how many would I need? Best wishes Melanie
    Asked on 1/16/2010 by Melanie Wiley

    2 answers

    • A:

      Dear Helen Yes that does help! And thank you for getting back so quickly. Best wishes Melanie

      Answered on 1/18/2010 by Melanie Wiley
    • A:

      Hello Melanie, The price is for 10 x bare root (ie no soil or pots) whips (ie thin-looking bare sticks) that will grow into large hedging plants. Ideally these should be planted at 30 - 45cm intervals, but you can plant them closer together, so you will need just one bundle of 10. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 1/18/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Hedging and Osmanthus plants

    Dear Crocus, I am looking for two Osmanthus burkwoodii plants but notice on your website that you only offer them for sale in 2 litre size. Do you have any larger Osmanthus burkwoodii plants? I am also looking for suggestions on which plants would make a good hedge. I am looking for something hardy, able to stand the frost, evergreen, not poisonous to horses and if possible, not just green possibly red / purple or variegated, any thoughts? Also, as these plants are grown in Surrey, will they be suitable to grow in the Scottish Borders? Many thanks, Jane
    Asked on 11/29/2009 by Janey Mitch

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Jane, I'm afraid we have all the plants we sell displayed on our website so we do not sell larger sizes of the Osmanthus. As for the hedging, if you click on the link below it will take you to our full range of hedging plants. Unfortunately we do not have anything that meets all your criteria, but if you click on the smaller images it will give you a lot more information on hardiness levels (fully hardy means they can cope with the weather in Scotland) as well as leaf colour etc. Unfortunately though I do not have a list of plants which are not poisonous to horses, but your local vet may be able to help you with this. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/hedging/plcid.30/ Best regards, Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 11/30/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Which plants are Deer proof?

    I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.
    Asked on 2/3/2006 by david

    1 answer

    • A:

      Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

      Answered on 2/6/2006 by Crocus
  • Q:

    Hawthorn hedging

    Regarding Hawthorn hedging, can you please tell me how many plants are included and what size they are?
    Asked on 1/1/2006 by Gary Ledger

    1 answer

    • A:

      We do three packs of hawthorn hedging. The first is for 25 bare-root plants, the second contains 50 and the third 100. All the plants will be around 40-60cm tall.

      Answered on 1/3/2006 by Crocus
  • Q:

    Help with creating a windbreak

    I live in Scotland and during the last weekend an old lilac bush blew down. The garden is small and north facing and is very exposed. I am at a loss as to what to plant as very little survives in the wind.
    Asked on 5/13/2005 by S A Morgan-Jones

    1 answer

  • Q:

    What hedge would you suggest?

    Can you suggest a hedge that I can grow? We have strong winds, a peat bog beside us and as I have sheep that break out, I would need a hedge that they wouldn't eat. Ideally I would like it to be evergreen.
    Asked on 5/8/2005 by RACHEL MCGETTIGAN

    1 answer

  • Q:

    What can I plant that the deers won't eat?

    What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.
    Asked on 3/18/2005 by Kelly L. Sliker

    1 answer

    • A:

      Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

      Answered on 3/21/2005 by Crocus
Displaying questions 1-8

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