Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple'

smoke bush

12lt pot (1-1.25) £49.99 £44.99 Buy
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Burgundy-red lollipop leaves held late into the year and, when the temperature drops, the leaves develop a bright-pink margin

Val Bourne - Garden Writer

1 year guarantee

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: moderately-fertile, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: July to August
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    This deciduous shrub has magnificent, dark red-purple oval leaves, that turn scarlet in autumn. In July and August, it is festooned with fluffy plumes of purplish-pink flowers that look like a haze of smoke. This is an eye-catching specimen plant for a sunny shrub or mixed border. The foliage, which appears almost translucent when backlit by the sun, is at its best when the plant has been pruned hard in March.

  • Garden care: In late winter or early spring remove any misplaced, diseased or crossing branches. Alternatively, to produce larger leaves, cut the stems back hard to within two or three buds of the base in early spring. After pruning apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted garden compost or manure around the base of the plant.

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5 Questions | 5 Answers
Displaying questions 1-5
  • Q:

    Hello,

    Can this plant be planted outside in January?

    Thanks
    Asked on 12/29/2013 by clueless! from Yorkshire

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello there
      As a general rule plants that are grown in containers can be planted at any time of year as long as the soil isn't frozen solid. The best times are in the autumn when the soil is still warm enough to encourage root growth but the plant isn't in active growth, or the spring before the temperatures start to rise.
      This plant is fully hardy so would be fine to plant now while it is still quite mild, as long as the ground isn't waterlogged.
      Hope this helps

      Answered on 1/2/2014 by Anonymous from Crocus
  • Q:

    Specimen Ceanothus or another large bushy shrub....

    Good afternoon, When I was first looking for a Ceanothus to replace the one we have in our front garden, I looked on your website, but you only had small ones. Our once lovely Ceanothus has been pruned out of all recognition again this year, as I planted it a bit too near our boundary when it was a baby. I know it may come back, but it is getting ridiculous as every time it grows back it has to be cut back again severely and then ooks a mess for most of the year. Have you got a nice, tall, bushy Ceanothus to replace it? I love my Ceanothus but perhaps if you don't have a big one, do you have another large, flowering shrub as an alternative? Hope you can help Regards Margaret
    Asked on 12/5/2009 by D DRAKETT

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Margaret, it is rare to find larger sized Ceanothus as they are usually quite short-lived and don't normally live longer than 6 - 8 years. We do have a selection of larger shrubs on our site like Hamamelis, Hydrangeas, Magnolias, Acer, Cornus, Cotinus, Philadelphus, Syringa and Viburnum, so you may find something of interest. They will be listed in this section. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 12/8/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple' hedge?

    Hi, Having seen a stunning display of the Cotinus planted with a band of Miscanthus sinensis 'Morning Light' in front of it, at the National Garden of Wales recently, I would like to try and reproduce the effect of the silver against the purple background. My problem however is space. I am in the process of providing a new bed which is approximately 6 feet long by 3 feet wide. Although you quote the Cotinus as growing to about 5m x 5m, you also suggest pruning it hard back to the base each year. If I prune annually as suggested, would it be possible to retain it to say a 1 - 1.5 m high bush, allowing the Miscanthus to be planted in front, thus forming a contrasting foil when viewed from both patio and lawn. If this is not considered viable, can you suggest another purple / dark red or similar bush that would provide a similar effect. Many thanks, Brian.
    Asked on 7/27/2009 by Brian Boon

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Brian, Cotinus is a pretty big shrub, but if you cut it back to within 2 or 3 buds from the base each year in early spring, then it shouldnt get too muchh higher than 1.5m. Alternatively you could opt for one of the purple leaved Berberis - just click on the following link to go straight to them. http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.berberis/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 7/27/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Cotinus 'Grace' not flowering

    Hello Crocus, I am having a problem with my Cotinus 'Grace'. It has the most enormous leaves but has not had many flowers this season. Could you shed any light as to why? I would be most grateful as it is a favorite of mine.Regards Louise
    Asked on 7/10/2009 by louise barton - warner

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Louise, Cotinus can be cut back hard each year and this will encourage the plant to produce really large leaves, but this is usually at the expense of the flowers. If you want flowers, then you should resist cutting it back each year.

      Answered on 7/13/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    I'm afraid you have been given bad advice as 'Smoke bushes' are fully
    hardy and don't need to be moved inside during cold nights. It is
    however a deciduous shrub so it will lose all its leaves in winter, so
    it is normal for it to look like a bare twig until the new leaves are
    produced in spring. Therefore I suspect it is still alive, and would
    recommend waiting until spring to see if it re-shoots.
    Asked on 2/28/2006 by Crocus

    1 answer

    • A:

      I think my 'Smoke bush' has died! I planted it the day I received it and
      have watered it regularly. Since we have had a number of frosts I have
      moved it into the garage on cold nights to prevent frost damage. I have
      done this on the advice of a professional gardener as it was a young
      plant and needed protection. Please can you let me know if you think it
      has died?

      Answered on 3/1/2006 by Maxine Mulrooney
Displaying questions 1-5

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