Cornus 'Eddie's White Wonder'

dogwood

2 litre pot
pot size guide
£39.99 Buy
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  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: deep, fertile, moisture-retentive soil
  • Rate of growth: slow to average
  • Flowering period: May
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    This is a stunning tree, with two seasons of interest, that really earns itsplace in the garden. In May, it produces masses of tiny, purplish-green flowers surrounded by large, showy, white, flower bracts. In autumn, the mid-green leaves turn brilliant shades of orange, red and purple. This broadly conical dogwood is an excellent specimen tree for small gardens. Although it tolerates dappled shade, it performs best in a sunny site with fertile, moisture-retentive soil.

  • Garden care: Incorporate a quantity of well-rotted garden compost or horse manure in the planting hole to improve the moisture retentive qualities of the soil.

Geranium phaeum 'Album'

dusky cranesbill

Small, white nodding flowers. Will thrive in shade

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Athyrium niponicum var. pictum

Japanese painted fern

Decorative, deciduous fern

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Galanthus nivalis f. pleniflorus 'Flore Pleno'

double snowdrop bulbs

A double form of snowdrop

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Hosta 'Francee' (fortunei)

plantain lily

Olive-green leaves with smart white margins

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7 Questions | 7 Answers
Displaying questions 1-7
  • Q:

    Can this be planted in a large pot?
    Asked on 4/26/2014 by sme21 from south Yorkshire

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello there
      This is a spectacular tree which can grow up to 6m x 5m eventually, and although it is fairly slow growing I wouldn't grow this in a container as it really needs deep, moist fertile soil which it is unlikely to get unless it is a really large container.
      Hope this helps

      Answered on 4/28/2014 by Anonymous from crocus
  • Q:

    My soil is mildly alkaline. How will this shrub respond?
    Asked on 3/18/2014 by Melisskin from Hertfordshire

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello there
      This shrub likes a neutral to acidic soil, so I wouldn't recommend growing it in an alkaline soil as it can develop chlorosis, or iron-deficiency.
      Hope this helps

      Answered on 3/20/2014 by Georgina from Crocus
  • Q:

    I am looking at your beautiful Cornus Eddie's White Wonder. Can this tree be carefully pruned so it doesn't get too big. I realise it has a slow maturing process. But the article says perfect for small gardens.
    Asked on 8/27/2013 by Timbo from Rugby

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello there
      Generally these trees don't need pruning as they are best left to develop their natural shape, but if it is needed, then prune lightly in late winter/early spring, but this may reduce the flowering bracts in the spring.
      Hope this helps

      Answered on 8/28/2013 by Georgina from Crocus
  • Q:

    Cornus Kousa - when will it start to grow in the Spring?

    I bought a Cornus Kousa from you last year. It is March now and at the moment it isn't showing much signs of life. Have the severe frosts etc. slowed down the growing process, and when can I expect it to start budding etc? Thank you
    Asked on 3/9/2010 by dorothy law

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello There, It is still too early for most plants to be showing any signs of life and as we have had such a severe winter, everything is even slower than usual. I would not expect to see any signs of life on your Cornus for at least 6 - 8 weeks. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 3/10/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Specimen Ceanothus or another large bushy shrub....

    Good afternoon, When I was first looking for a Ceanothus to replace the one we have in our front garden, I looked on your website, but you only had small ones. Our once lovely Ceanothus has been pruned out of all recognition again this year, as I planted it a bit too near our boundary when it was a baby. I know it may come back, but it is getting ridiculous as every time it grows back it has to be cut back again severely and then ooks a mess for most of the year. Have you got a nice, tall, bushy Ceanothus to replace it? I love my Ceanothus but perhaps if you don't have a big one, do you have another large, flowering shrub as an alternative? Hope you can help Regards Margaret
    Asked on 12/5/2009 by D DRAKETT

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Margaret, it is rare to find larger sized Ceanothus as they are usually quite short-lived and don't normally live longer than 6 - 8 years. We do have a selection of larger shrubs on our site like Hamamelis, Hydrangeas, Magnolias, Acer, Cornus, Cotinus, Philadelphus, Syringa and Viburnum, so you may find something of interest. They will be listed in this section. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 12/8/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    My Cornus has not flowered?

    I have a dogwood - Cornus 'Eddies White Wonder' and it has not flowered. Can you tell me why?
    Asked on 7/8/2009 by B Homer

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello There, It is not unusual for these plants to take a few years to settle in before they start to produce flowers so you may need a little patience - but once they start they are well worth the wait. You can help them along by making sure they get lots of sun, and feed them with a good general purpose fertilise during the growing season.

      Answered on 7/9/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Can I prune my dogwood now?

    I have a small Cornus florida that was planted in the Autumn. It is bushier than I would like as I want a tree rather than shrub. Its starting to bud now and I probably should have pruned it in the winter, but is it too late now?
    Asked on 3/17/2005 by Richard Stanaro

    1 answer

    • A:

      Ideally you should prune this Cornus in late winter or early spring. However you may still get away with it if you do it very soon. Just cut back the branches you don't want by pruning to an outward facing bud.

      Answered on 3/21/2005 by Crocus
Displaying questions 1-7

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