Cornus controversa

wedding cake tree

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All you can buy delivered for £4.99

  • Position: full sun to part shade
  • Soil: deep, fertile, moisture-retentive soil
  • Rate of growth: slow-growing to average
  • Flowering period: June
  • Flower colour: white
  • Other features: the fruits may cause a mild stomach ache if ingested
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Large clusters of white flowers in June, followed by spherical, blue-black fruit, and glossy, dark green leaves, turning rich red and purple in autumn. The horizontally tiered spreading branches of this deciduous dogwood provide an excellent focal-point for a medium to large-sized garden. Rounded in shape, it performs best in fertile, moisture-retentive soil in full sun.

  • Garden care: Incorporate a quantity of well-rotted garden compost or horse manure in the planting hole to improve the moisture-retentive qualities of the soil. The tree requires no regular pruning, since this would interfere with its graceful, tiered habit.

Astilbe 'Fanal' (× arendsii)

false goatsbeard

Fluffy, wine-red flower spires

£7.99 Buy

Hosta sieboldiana var. elegans

plantain lily

Heart shaped, pale green leaves and fragrant flowers

£8.99 Buy

Vinca minor 'Atropurpurea'

lesser periwinkle

Delicious dark damson-purple flowers

£8.99 Buy
 

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3 Questions | 3 Answers
Displaying questions 1-3
  • Q:

    Specimen Ceanothus or another large bushy shrub....

    Good afternoon, When I was first looking for a Ceanothus to replace the one we have in our front garden, I looked on your website, but you only had small ones. Our once lovely Ceanothus has been pruned out of all recognition again this year, as I planted it a bit too near our boundary when it was a baby. I know it may come back, but it is getting ridiculous as every time it grows back it has to be cut back again severely and then ooks a mess for most of the year. Have you got a nice, tall, bushy Ceanothus to replace it? I love my Ceanothus but perhaps if you don't have a big one, do you have another large, flowering shrub as an alternative? Hope you can help Regards Margaret
    Asked on 12/5/2009 by D DRAKETT

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Margaret, it is rare to find larger sized Ceanothus as they are usually quite short-lived and don't normally live longer than 6 - 8 years. We do have a selection of larger shrubs on our site like Hamamelis, Hydrangeas, Magnolias, Acer, Cornus, Cotinus, Philadelphus, Syringa and Viburnum, so you may find something of interest. They will be listed in this section. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 12/8/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Are ants eating my Sunflowers?

    Hi there I bought some sunflowers and planted them. They were doing well, but then the stem seems to be rotting at the base. There are some ants about. This has happened with both sunflowers in pots and in the ground. A few years ago I grew sunflowers without any trouble at all. Thanks so much in advance. Farah
    Asked on 6/19/2009 by Farah Nazeer

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Farah, Ants will not cause any harm, however they are usually present when there are other sap sucking insects about. The most likely sucpects would be slugs and snails or caterpillars so keep a look out for these. I'm afraid though that if the stems are badly damaged there is little you can do to save the plants. I'm sorry not to be more help, Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 6/19/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Can I prune my dogwood now?

    I have a small Cornus florida that was planted in the Autumn. It is bushier than I would like as I want a tree rather than shrub. Its starting to bud now and I probably should have pruned it in the winter, but is it too late now?
    Asked on 3/17/2005 by Richard Stanaro

    1 answer

    • A:

      Ideally you should prune this Cornus in late winter or early spring. However you may still get away with it if you do it very soon. Just cut back the branches you don't want by pruning to an outward facing bud.

      Answered on 3/21/2005 by Crocus
Displaying questions 1-3

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November pruning of trees and shrubs

By November the garden is well and truly dormant, so it’s a good time to prune many deciduous garden trees. As for October, prune newly planted trees to remove any damaged growth and help balance the shape of the canopy as well as maintain a dominant main

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