Clematis 'Jackmanii Superba'

clematis (group 3)

2lt pot (60cm cane)
pot size guide
£12.99 £9.99 Buy
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  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: July to August
  • Flower colour: large, open dark purple blooms
  • Other features: plenty of velvety flowers cover the climber
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Large rich dark purple flowers, with either 4, 5 or 6 petals clothe this popular and reliable late-flowering clematis. The abundant blooms appear from mid- to late summer and look fantastic when grown up a trellis or wall. It is also a good clematis to grow through shrubs or trees as it is pruned right back and so never becomes too much of a burden on the supporting plant.

  • Garden care: Cut back stems to a pair of strong buds 15-20cm (6-8in) above ground level before growth begins in early spring. Mulch in late winter with garden compost or well-rotted manure but avoid the immediate crown.

Clematis 'Arabella'

clematis (group 3)

Perfect for scrambling through shrubs

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Rosa 'Climbing Etoile de Hollande'

rose Etoile de Hollande (climbing hybrid tea)

Sumptuous crimson rose

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6 Questions | 7 Answers
Displaying questions 1-6
  • Q:

    Please could you advise me whether I can grow jasmine and honeysuckle together in the same large pot, to give wall cover? Or whether there is a better combination (maybe jasmine/clematis or honeysuckle/clematis)? Thank you in advance for your help.
    Asked on 4/21/2013 by chrigi from Istria, Croatia

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      Ideally you should grow just one climber per pot as otherwise they will be competing for all the available water and nutrients. Also I am guessing you will want the climbers to get to a reasonable size, so they will need to be able to develop as large a rootball as possible.

      Answered on 4/22/2013 by Helen from Crocus
  • Q:

    Climbers for trellis with wildlife considerations

    Hi I have a bare trellis at the end of my garden which marks the end of my raspberry and rhubarb beds, and where my composting and comfrey live. I want to cover this trellis with something to give colour all the year round, even if that "colour" is green leaves. I also want to provide something beneficial to the wildlife. I had thought about growing an Ivy, with a Clematis. Would these two climbers work in a small area and would I get my combination of colour, all year interest and wildlife benefits? Thanks Mike
    Asked on 3/17/2010 by Mike Simpson

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Mike, The best climbers for wildlife are Hederas (Ivy) or Lonicera (Honeysuckles). These are both pretty big and vigorous plants though and your trellis sounds quite small. The ivy can be cut back very hard though, so perhaps your best option would be to use an ivy and then plant a smaller growing group 3 Clematis, which should be cut in early spring each year. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 3/17/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Climber advice for garage wall

    Dear all, I would be very grateful if you could advise me on covering the sideof my garage wall. It is south facing and approx 4m wide x approx 2m high. I would love to cover it with Jasminum officinale and Clematis 'Jackmanii Superba' together. Please could you advise how many plants I should use to cover this wall, the spacing required -whether to plant them next to each other, at opposite ends of the wall, and how far away from the wall. I would also be really grateful if you could let me know the best time to plant them. Many thanks in advance of your help. Kind regards, Carys
    Asked on 1/29/2010 by Carys Everitt

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Carys, The Jasminum has an eventual height of 12m and spread of 3m, while the Clematis will grow to 3m tall by 1m wide. Therefore if youare patient, you will only need one of each to cover the w all. If however you want more immediate cover then you can plant more (say two or three of the Clematis as these are less boistrous in the long term), but you will need to be cutting them back like mad as they mature. As for spacing, they should be planted at least 30 - 50cm away from the wall and leaned in towards the wires or trellis. This will ensure they get the rain and will not dry out too quickly. I would not plant them right at each end of the wall, but move them in by around 50cm to 1m as they will then grow out in both dorections. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 2/17/2010 by Carys Everitt
  • Q:

    Climbers for North East facing wall

    Hi I was just wondering if you could give me some advice please. Our house is a Victorian end of terrace - the side of the house faces North-East. The side of the house is very bare (only two tiny windows on ground floor) and we would like to grow something up the wall. We have had trouble with graffiti in the past and want to paint the side of the house and then put trellis to about 7ft. Can you suggest something that would grow quite quickly please. Kind Regards Joanna
    Asked on 11/6/2009 by Joanna Swainson

    2 answers

    • A:

      Thank you so much Helen, this helps a lot.

      Answered on 11/9/2009 by Joanna Swainson
    • A:

      Hello Joanna, If you click on the link below it will take you to our fast growing climbers, which will cope with low light levels. If you click into each card you can then see the eventual height and spread of each plant - some of them are pretty big. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/plcid.15/vid.186/vid.237/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 11/9/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    I am ok to still plant in October?

    Hi there, I am really new to gardening so you hope you can help me! I have ordered these plants below, ..... if they arrive in 1-2 weeks time is it still going to be alright to plant? (probably a question I should have asked before I placed the order!!)I know there is a certain time by which you need to get all your planting done before it gets to cold. Athyrium niponicum var. pictum, Acer palmatum var. dissectum 'Crimson Queen', Heuchera villosa 'Palace Purple', Luzula nivea, Clematis 'Jackmanii Superba', Clematis florida var. sieboldiana. Appreciate your advise. Cheers,
    Asked on 10/1/2009 by Mearah Wanigasekera

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello There, As a general rule hardy plants that are grown in containers can be planted at any time of year as long as the soil isn't frozen solid. The best times are in the autumn when the soil is still warm enough to encourage root growth but the plant isn't in active growth, or the spring before the temperatures start to rise. You can also plant in mid summer as long as you make sure the plants are kept well watered. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 10/1/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Climbing Plant on a North-Facing Trellis

    Dear Sir/Madam, Could you recommend a climbing plant for a trellis? The trellis in question is set against my neighbour's wall, and faces northward. So, I'm looking for a plant to provide maximum, attractive, fast-growing coverage. Yours faithfully, Peter
    Asked on 8/18/2009 by Peter Lawson

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Peter, I have done a search on our Plant Finder and if you click on the following link it will take you to all the climbers which will grow on a north facing aspect and are fast growing (although keep in mind most plants are going into their dormant period now) http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/climbers/plcid.15/vid.186/vid.237/ I hope this helps.

      Answered on 8/19/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
Displaying questions 1-6

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