Caryopteris × clandonensis 'Heavenly Blue'

bluebeard

2 litre pot
pot size guide
£9.99 Buy
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Looks very becoming planted as a backdrop to low-growing architectural grasses or underplanted with summer bulbs such as galtonia and acidanthera

Lucy Summers - Greenfingers Guides

5 year guarantee

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: moderately fertile, light, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: August and September
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Clusters of piercing, slightly fluffy, dark blue flowers appear in August and September at intervals on long stems among pointed, aromatic, grey-green leaves. With its strongly upright habit, this lovely, dark blue form of bluebeard is perfect for the middle of a sunny shrub or mixed border. It is also a magnet for bees and butterflies and is drought-tolerant. Where temperatures fall below -15°C it's best grown against a warm, south or west-facing wall.

  • Garden care: In March prune all of the flowered stems back hard to the permanent framework. After pruning apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted garden compost around the base of the plant.


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REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

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CrocusCaryopteris x clandonensis 'Heavenly Blue'
 
4.0

(based on 1 review)

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(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
4.0

Striking colour

By Maureen

from Stafford

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Attractive
  • Hardy
  • Healthy

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Garden

    Comments about Caryopteris x clandonensis 'Heavenly Blue':

    The centrepiece of our border, it flowered until late autumn
    Can't wait to see how it does over winter and hope it will be as good next year

    • Your Gardening Experience:
    • Experienced

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    Do you want to ask a question about this?

    If so, click on the button and fill in the box below. We will post the question on the website, together with your alias (bunnykins, digger1, plantdotty etc etc) and where you are from (Sunningdale/Glasgow etc). We'll also post the answer to your question!
    1 Question | 2 Answers
    Displaying question 1
    • Q:

      Is it still ok to be cutting back herbaceous perennials, Lavender and Caryopteris late in the year?

      Dear Crocus, I didn't have time to cut back to ground level all my herbaceous perennial plants and some shrubs in the autumn, due to work and family commitments. It's difficult to get out into the garden just now as I only have a little time at the weekend. Would it be too late for me to cut everything back still between now in December and the end of February e.g hardy Geraniums, Hostas,etc. and shrubs like Lavenders and Caryopteris? I really would appreciate your advice. Many thanks Pamela
      Asked on 13/12/2009 by Pamela Spiers

      2 answers

      • A:

        Hi Helen, Thank you for your helpful information. The snow made the decision for me, it has lain for 4 weeks now. Kind Regards Pamela

        Answered on 9/1/2010 by Pamela Spiers
      • A:

        Hello Pamela, You can do the herbaceous perennials anytime between now and spring, but the Caryopteris and Lavenders should be tackled in spring. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

        Answered on 15/12/2009 by Crocus Helpdesk
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    April pruning of trees, shrubs and
    climbers

    Many shrubs, trees and climbers are showing signs of growth, so it is an ideal time to check them over for winter damage. If you feel they need a little care and attention, here are a few notes to use as a pruning guide. during April.

    Read full article