carrot 'Adelaide'

carrot / Daucus carota 'Adelaide'

approx 500 seeds £1.79 Buy
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  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, well drained and light

    One of the earliest maturing varieties available, ‘Adelaide’ has short tops with smooth skinned, cylindrical roots, that fill out quickly to give a crunchy sweet flavour. It’s ideal for sowing early in cold frames and you will be one of the first to be pull up carrots this spring! Carrots make a healthy, nutritious addition to your daily diet as they are high in Vitamin A and beta-carotene, and rich in antioxidants.
    Growing Instructions:
    Sow January to February under cloches or cold frames, or from March to August outside. Sow the seed thinly in well prepared, fertile soil 1-2cm deep in broad drills 30cm apart. Thin to 2-2.5cm or give slightly wider spacings if larger roots are required. Water only if necessary as excessive water may encourage too much leafy growth at the expense of the roots, and earth up to prevent green crowns forming. Later sowings should be covered with fleece or fine netting to minimise carrot fly infestation.
    If you have to thin the seedlings, water well beforehand and do it in the evening, removing all the debris. Alternatively, young carrots can always be thinned using the 'thin as you eat' techinque.

  • Sow: Jan to August

  • Harvest: May to November

  • Approximate quantity: 500 seeds

radish 'Gaudry 2'

radish / Raphanus sativus 'Gaudry 2'

This variety is a small round salad radish with red neck and white base.

£2.35 Buy

kohl rabi 'Purple Delicacy'

kohl rabi / Brassica oleracea (Gongylodes Group)

A tasty alternative to the turnip

£1.29 Buy

Jerusalem artichoke Fuseau

Jerusalem artichoke bulbs

Great alternative to potatoes

£3.99 Buy

potato 'Sarpo Mira' (PBR)

potato - maincrop Scottish basic seed potato

Great blight resistance

£8.99 Buy
 

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3 Questions | 3 Answers
Displaying questions 1-3
  • Q:

    When do I plant potatoes and other veg?

    When is the best time to plants potatoes? Also can you advise me what veg I could grow now until March with poly tunnels?
    Asked on 4/10/2006 by Bets Ingram

    1 answer

    • A:

      You can start chitting your early and maincrop seed potatoes in February, but the best time to plant is in early to mid spring. As for growing vegetables in your polytunnels, you have lots of options. Spinach, kale, and some varieties of lettuce will live through the winter in a polytunnel. Certain kinds of onion work well from an autumn sowing, and you'll get a much earlier crop than if you'd waited until spring. Other possibilities are cabbage, Pak Choy, Chinese cabbage, and most root crops. Leeks, beets, carrots, turnips, parsnips and radishes, can be sown for winter harvest

      Answered on 5/10/2006 by Crocus
  • Q:

    Am I too late to grow vegetables?

    I'd love to grow my own potatoes, onions and carrots, which I use a lot in the kitchen, but don't know where to start or if I'm too late. Please can you advise me?
    Asked on 24/1/2006 by Debora Everard

    1 answer

    • A:

      Now is the perfect time to start thinking about growing potatoes, as they need to be chitted before planting. Chitting just encourages shoots to grow before you pop them in the soil in early spring. The onion sets can be planted in March or April, while carrot seeds can be sown from late February as long as they are protected.

      Answered on 25/1/2006 by Crocus
  • Q:

    What veg can I grow with my runner beans?

    Dad has grown runner beans on the same patch for years. Is it ok to grow leeks, kohlrabi, carrots and sprouts on this patch or even courgettes? I am trying to get a crop rotation underway but there is limited space.
    Asked on 22/3/2005 by Jan Hamilton-Taylor

    1 answer

    • A:

      The purpose of crop rotation is to reduce build-up of soil borne pests and diseases, and continuous cropping of the same vegetable can lead to an inbalance of soil nutrients. The plants you mention should be fine to grow in the same spot as the beans this year, but you will need to add plenty of organic matter to the area before planting and I wouldn't recommend growing the carrots or sprouts in the same spot next year. Even if the area is small, it really will help if you can try and work out a crop rotation to avoid problems in the future.

      Answered on 23/3/2005 by Crocus
Displaying questions 1-3

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