Astrantia major 'Rubra'

masterwort

2 litre pot £9.99 Buy
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Smaller flowers and not as red as many but an excellent encore planted among hellebores

Val Bourne - Garden Writer

1 year guarantee

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, moist, preferably humus-rich soil
  • Rate of growth: average to fast
  • Flowering period: June to August
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Small, papery, plum- Small, papery, plum-coloured, pincushion-like flowers surrounded by a ruff of wine-tinted bracts, are produced from June to August above deeply lobed, dark green leaves. Although it is an old cottage-garden favourite, this astrantia works equally well in contemporary-style plantings. Use it towards the front of a sunny, yet moist border. Astrantias do not like dry soil. The faded blooms are best cut back close to the ground to prolong flowering.

    Astrantias have been cultivated in Britain since the 16th century and have numerous common names, such as melancholy gentleman, Hatties pincushion and the more well known masterwort.

  • Garden care: Incorporate plenty of organic matter when planting and water well in dry weather especially newly established plants. Lift and divide large clumps in early spring and apply a generous 5-7 cm mulch of well-rotted manure or garden compost around the plant. Divided specimens may take some time to establish since they dont like having their roots disturbed.


Geranium himalayense 'Gravetye'

cranesbill

Large, purple-blue flowers with reddish centres

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Geranium Dreamland ('Bremdream')

geranium

Puts on a prolific, long-lasting display

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Persicaria bistorta 'Superba'

bistort

Showy spikes of pale pink flowers. This plant loves damp soil!

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Iris 'Caesar's Brother'

Siberian iris

Intense violet flowers. Great in reliably moist soil

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  • Q:

    Can I plant this in September along with some foxgloves. ? I want to jazz up my border and I would rather do this at the end of the season when I can remember what is in it!!
    Asked on 8/9/2013 by Orchid lover from Winchester

    1 answer

    • Plant Doctor

      A:

      Hello,

      Autumn is a great time to plant these as the soil is still relatively warm. Just remember that they die down in winter, so you may need to put a marker where they are, so you can look for them again in spring.

      Answered on 8/12/2013 by Helen from Crocus
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