Aquilegia vulgaris var. stellata 'Ruby Port'

granny's bonnet

2 litre pot
pot size guide
£7.49 Buy
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Wine-red aquilegia beloved by garden designers and lovely with late the lemon white tulip ‘Purissima picking up the pale-yellow stamens of ‘Ruby Port’

Val Bourne - Garden Writer

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  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average to fast-growing
  • Flowering period: May to June
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    A popular plant among garden designers, this lovely grannys bonnet has beautiful, fully double, spur-less burgundy flowers in late spring above ferny green leaves. The rich, deep red flowers look particularly lovely with fountainous grasses or with traditional cottage garden flowers. This plant is happiest in soil that retains moisture over the summer. It is quite short-lived, but self-seeds freely, though it rarely becomes a nuisance.

  • Garden care: Lift and divide large clumps in early spring and apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted manure or garden compost around the plant. Divided specimens may take some time to establish since they don't like having their roots disturbed. Contact with the sap may cause skin irritation.

Deschampsia cespitosa

tufted hair grass

Ideal for sun or shade

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Actaea simplex Atropurpurea Group

bugbane (syn. Cimicifuga)

A late-flowering perennial for shade

£12.99 Buy

Briza media

common quaking grass

Effective and long lasting perennial grass

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Astrantia 'Hadspen Blood'

masterwort

Sultry, dark red flowers

£11.99 Buy
 

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2 Questions | 3 Answers
Displaying questions 1-2
  • Q:

    2006 Planting Chelsea Flower Show enquiry

    Hi, I see you have plants available for the current show, but do you have a plant list for the 2006 award winner (Daily Telegraph,Tom Stuart Smith) available as I am interested in buying some of these plants? Thank you for your time, Kelly
    Asked on 4/5/2010 by kelly mackenzie

    1 answer

    • A:

      Hello Kelly, He did use a lot of plants in his garden - here is a list which includes most. Allium Purple Sensation Anthriscus Ravens Wing Aquilegia Ruby Port Astrantia Claret Carex testacea Cirsium rivulare atropurpureum Dahlia Dark Desire Euphorbia Fireglow Geranium Lily Lovell Geranium phaeum Samobor Geranium Phillipe Valpelle Geranium psilostemmon Geum Princess Juliana Gillenia trifoliata Hakonechloa macra Iris Dusky Challenger Iris Dutch Chocolate Iris Sultan's Palace Iris Superstition Iris Supreme Sultan Knautia macedonica Lavandula angustifolia Nepeta subsessilis Washfield Nepeta Walkers low Purple fennel - Giant Bronze Rodgersia pinnata Superba Rodgersia podophylla Salvia Mainacht Sedum matrona Stachys byzantina Stipa arundinacea (syn.Anemanthele lessoniana) Stipa gigantea Tulip Abu Hassan Tulip Ballerina Tulip Queen of Night Verbascum Helen Johnston I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 4/6/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
  • Q:

    Growing plants for a wedding

    Dear Crocus, I am a very happy customer ..... I love your site, plants and service. I learnt about you first from Arabella Lennox-Boyd. But now I am writing for some advice please. My sister is getting married in Oxfordshire on the last weekend of May. I would love to grow the flowers for the wedding. I have a big garden with empty beds and a green house at my disposal. Could you give me some advice on types of cut flowers that would be in bloom at the end of May? Some pointers as a place to start my research and buying would be fantastic. Thank you very much, Best wishes, Kate
    Asked on 1/8/2010 by Kate Olivia Higginbottom

    2 answers

    • A:

      Thank you so much Helen - amazing! I'll send you photos of the finished results. Best wishes and thanks again, Kate

      Answered on 1/8/2010 by Crocus Helpdesk
    • A:

      Hello Kate, It will be a little hit and miss as a lot will depend on the weather, but the following plants should be in flower around that time. Choisya ternata
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/choisya-ternata-/classid.825/
      Osmanthus x burkwoodii
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/osmanthus-%C3%97-burkwoodii-/classid.4171/
      Syringa http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.syringa/
      Viburnum x carlcephalum
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/viburnum-%C3%97-carlcephalum-/classid.4460/
      Convallaria majalis
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.convallaria/ Iris
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.iris/ Paeonia
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.paeonia/ Euphorbia palustris
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/euphorbia-palustris-/classid.2794/
      Aquilegia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.aquilegia/
      Ceanothus Skylark
      http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/ceanothus-thyrsiflorus-skylark/classid.728/
      and if we have a hot start to the summer a couple of roses or some of the earlier lavenders may have started too. I hope this gives you lots of ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

      Answered on 1/8/2010 by Kate Olivia Higginbottom
Displaying questions 1-2

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Aquilegias - nectar-rich and lovely

These cottage garden essentials take their name from Aquila, Latin for eagle, because the nectar-rich spurs at the back of the flower resemble eagle's talons. Their other common name, columbine, is also related to a bird. If you turn the flowers upside d

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