Achillea filipendulina 'Cloth of Gold'

yarrow

2 litre pot
pot size guide
£7.99 Buy
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  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: June to September
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Achilleas are in vogue again, thanks in part to the many different colours and cultivars that have become available in recent years. This is one of the biggest, with flat, plate-like heads of deep yellow flowers held high on tall stems, with ferny foliage beneath. This achillea is long-lasting, and drought-tolerant, but needs a lot of space to spread out. Try it in a sunny spot at the back of a herbaceous border, or among grasses, but be sure to stake it, as it tends to flop over in wet weather. It makes an excellent cut flower.

  • Garden care: Achilleas do not like wet soil. Stake using bamboo canes or brushwood before the flowers appear. Cut down to the ground in late winter. Lift and divide large clumps in late autumn or early spring.


Calamagrostis × acutiflora 'Karl Foerster'

feather reed grass

Upright and architectural

£4.99 Buy

Knautia arvensis

field scabious

A great nectar source for butterflies

£1.49 Buy

Verbascum 'Clementine'

mullein

Tall, colourful and stately, a wonderful accent plant

£8.99 Buy

Knautia macedonica

knautia

Crimson, pincushion-like flowers

£7.99 Buy

Alcea rosea 'Nigra'

hollyhock (Althea)

Bees love their flowers

£4.99 Buy
 

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